Thirteen Goats – Servants Of The Outer Dark – Album Review

Artist: Thirteen Goats

Album Title: Servants Of The Outer Dark

Label: Independent Release

Date of Release: 1 July 2022

I’m really not entirely sure how I should view this album, and how I should go about reviewing it.

Thirteen Goats is a new name to me, and to the metal world at large, with little known about the band, other than they like heavy, extreme metal, they have a sense of humour, and ‘Servants Of The Outer Dark’ is their debut full-length offering. Comprised of three musicians, Graham K. Miles (vocals, lead and rhythm guitars), Rob Fitzgerald (lead and rhythm guitars, vocals), and Mike Redston (bass, vocals, acoustic guitar), this band is then rounded out in the live arena by drummer Leonid Verman, with the bass duties switching to Cody Lewichew. Together, this ensemble takes us into a world of death metal that is hard to definitively describe.

Apparently, according to the ‘fun facts’ presented within the accompanying press release Miles is a classically trained Shakespearian actor with a master’s degree in theatre from the New School for Drama in New York City. This goes some way to explain the more flamboyant elements to this album that show up throughout, although maybe some of it was an outlet for the frontman to turn his pain into something creative – Miles played all of his guitar solos with a broken finger and two sprained wrists following a motorbike accident midway through the recording process. This is some feat and perhaps helps to underline the apparent determination and hunger of Thirteen Goats to succeed where so many others have failed. Clearly, they are made of strong stuff up there in Canada.

The thing that threw me from the very beginning, and still does to some extent, is the way in which the opening title track differs so markedly from the remainder of the album. The band themselves admit that this is the most melodic song on the album, but that doesn’t really tell the full story because ‘Servants Of The Outer Dark’ is so much more catchy and immediate than the rest of the album. With a gentle acoustic guitar-led intro, clean vocals and a full-on melodic death metal hook-laden chorus, it becomes disconcerting to not hear anything of its like again within any of the subsequent eight songs. That isn’t to say that the remainder of the material isn’t good, it’s just that I feel I have to register the slight pang of disappointment I encountered when I realised that there was no similar output anywhere else on the album.

With time, I have been able to make peace with the initial feelings of disappointment, not least because there is some genuinely great material to be heard on the album if you take the time to listen and treat the songs on their own merits. For example, ‘Challenge The Executioner’ is a thunderous and aggressive beast of a death metal track, with an impressive array of technical-sounding riffs, vibrant bass work, and some truly bruising drumming. It’s a song that proves that these guys have the ability and the chops to succeed, whilst channelling bands like Lamb Of God into their output.

On the other hand, you have a song like ‘Return To Ruin’ that is part thrash-infused monster, and part groove fest. Again, it is heavy and aggressive with the speed to match when the pace is kicked up a notch, but equally, the slower sections are no shrinking violets either, with a steamroller-like, pounding groove. The juxtaposition works really well, too, making it a much more memorable and enjoyable affair than I first gave it credit for. The spoken-word part is a little hammed-up, but it further emphasises the thrash vibe, backed up by lyrics that touch on the political, talking about institutions that have failed this current generation. The political content is maintained elsewhere, such as within the more no-frills, dialled up to eleven attack of ‘Prisoner’s Anthem’.

And then you have songs with names like ‘Through the Meat Grinder…The Recipe’ which is about as serious as a clown on a unicycle. Mind you, the song itself is nothing to be laughed at, what with its slow doom-like intro that then explodes into full-on death metal territory before veering into all sorts of wild and wonderful places, the musical equivalent of a toddler searching high and low for the biscuit tin. And how about the opening to ‘Sub-being’ which begins with a twisted circus ringleader’s address to the audience – it’s a little incongruous, as is the ensuing ‘whoop, whoop’ declaration before a brutal slab of death metal kicks in to blow our heads off.

As I declared right at the start, this is a difficult album to review as it has a little bit of everything within it, without nailing any colours firmly to the mast. The death metal quota is highest and acts as the framework around which everything else congregates, but even after several weeks in the company of this album, I don’t instinctively think of it as a death metal album. And that’s because of the wide variety of influences at play and, dare I say it, a lack of genuine, true identity from the band. Instead, I’ll cop out slightly and refer to it as extreme metal where just about anything goes. Nevertheless, I’d urge you to take a listen to ‘Servants Of The Outer Dark’ because as debuts go, there is an awful lot to enjoy within it. I also have a strong sense when I listen, that there is plenty more to come from Thirteen Goats. I certainly hope so.

The Score of Much Metal: 80%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Vomit Forth – Seething Malevolence

Greylotus – Downfall

My Soliloquy – Fu3ion

Pestilent Hex – The Ashen Abhorrence

Porcupine Tree – Closure / Continuation

Conjurer – Páthos

Ironflame – Where Madness Dwells

Horizon Ignited – Towards The Dying Lands

Municipal Waste – Electrified Brain

Paganizer – Behind The Macabre

Philosophobia – Philosophobia

Darkane – Inhuman Spirits

Exocrine – The Hybrid Suns

Fallen Sanctuary – Terranova

Deathwhite – Grey Everlasting

Charlie Griffiths – Tiktaalika

Seven Kingdoms – Zenith

Brutta – Brutta

White Ward – False Light

Winds Of Tragedy – As Time Drifts Away

Tim Bowness – Butterfly Mind

Denouncement Pyre – Forever Burning

Truent – Through The Vale Of Earthly Torment

Wind Rose – Warfront

Kardashev – Liminal Rite

Artificial Brain -Artificial Brain

Seventh Wonder – The Testament

Kreator – Hate Über Alles

All Things Fallen – Shadow Way

Def Leppard – Diamond Star Halos

Lord Belial – Rapture

Buried Realm – Buried Realm

Stiriah – …Of Light

Remains Of Destruction – New Dawn

Crematory – Inglorious Darkness

IATT – Magnum Opus

Iris Divine – Mercurial

Decapitated – Cancer Culture

Bekmørk – The Path Nocturnal

Septic Flesh – Modern Primitive

Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses

Drift Into Black – Earthtorn

Spheric Universe Experience – Back Home

Outshine – The Awakening

Cosmic Putrefaction – Crepuscular Dirge For The Blessed Ones

Zero Hour – Agenda 21

Scitalis – Doomed Before Time

Morgue Supplier – Inevitability

Visions Of Atlantis – Pirates

Evergrey – A Heartless Portrait (The Orphean Testament)

OU – One

Haunter – Discarnate Ails

Aara – Triade II: Hemera

Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Horizon Ignited – Towards The Dying Lands – Album Review

Artist: Horizon Ignited

Album Title: Towards The Dying Lands

Label: Nuclear Blast Records

Date of Release: 1 July 2022

A combination of melodic death metal and Finland? That sounds like a marriage made in heaven to me. For a start, there’s no doubting the heavy metal credentials of this country across a huge range of subgenres, but it is also home to my favourite melodic death metal band of all time: Omnium Gatherum. Reading that the guitarist for this band and Insomnium, Mr Markus Vanhala, makes an appearance on the title track with a lead solo just sealed the deal and I willingly placed my ears in the care of ‘Towards The Dying Lands’, the sophomore release from Horizon Ignited, following 2019’s debut ‘After The Storm’.

Formed in 2017, Horizon Ignited is a sextet comprised of vocalist Okko Solanterä, guitarists Johannes Mäkinen and Vili Vottonen, keyboardist Miska Ek, bassist Jukka Haarala, and drummer Jiri Vanhatalo. And whether or not you’ll like this record will depend on a few factors including how you prefer your melodic death metal to sound. We all know how varied the output can be when placed under this loose and overarching description, and Horizon Ignited have a very definite approach. Put it this way, if you’re wanting to hear the next Omnium Gatherum, this isn’t the record for you. Equally, if you want a similar sound to Amon Amarth, At The Gates, or Insomnium, there’s a fair chance that you’ll end up a little disappointed I’m afraid.

Instead, the tack that Horizon Ignited have chosen sees them more closely aligned to more current era In Flames, with a hint of the melodic end of Dark Tranquillity peeking through. Add to this a modern sheen, a reasonable dose of metalcore and some moments where alt rock plays a part, and you’ll be in the general vicinity of these Finns’ output. Going in blind to this album, with only the words ‘melodic death metal’ and ‘Finland’ in my mind, I must admit I was surprised by what I heard subsequently. Not one to arbitrarily dismiss a band because it wasn’t what I was expecting, I charged on regardless to see what I thought.

Having done just that, I’m going to be honest and say that the style of music that Horizon Ignited offer up on ‘Towards The Dying Lands’ is probably not what I’d normally choose to listen to, but that doesn’t mean that the finished article is not without merit. For my personal tastes though, the music is just a bit too polished, a bit too clean, a bit too mainstream-sounding, and at times, not quite heavy enough to send me off into raptures.

Despite this summary, there is plenty that I can still get on board with. As such, I think that the band should be commended that their performances and song writing ability are such that I can still find a certain amount of enjoyment with their music even if it doesn’t sit within my normal wheelhouse. The music is definitely catchy and melodic, so that’s an element that’s very hard to ignore for a start.

From the outset, there’s a demonstrable In Flames vibe within the guitar tones and the chosen riffs of ‘Beyond Your Reach’. The song rides along at a solid mid-tempo, with chunky guitars and a strong rhythmic spine, the growls of Okko Solanterä properly deep and powerful too. The chorus, however, reveals a clean approach that’s far more melodic and mainstream, almost befitting an alt-rock or nu-metal band. The song is well put together and reasonably memorable, but even at this early stage, I’m searching for a ‘wow’ factor, or interesting USP that fails to fully materialise.  

This lack of a unique selling point continues as the album further develops, with song after song delivering some decent riffs, a nice hooky chorus, and the familiar blend of gruff and clean vocals. Tracks like ‘Servant’ or ‘Reveries’ will get stuck in your head because they are enjoyable compositions, that benefit from a good production that affords clarity to all concerned. But there just isn’t enough here to convince me that ‘Towards The Dying Lands’ is anything truly special unfortunately.

A few of the songs either open with clean vocals or feature this delivery more prominently. When this is the case, the melodic death metal descriptor becomes that little bit more tenuous to say the least. The title track is one of these very songs, which despite featuring the guest lead solo from Omnium Gatherum and Insomnium’s Markus Vanhala, sounds more like a meaty mainstream heavy metal song rather than a cutting or bludgeoning slice of death metal. Other tracks of this ilk include ‘Guiding Light’ with its sprawling chorus that has more of an EMO, or metalcore vibe than anything approaching extreme metal. Then there’s the quasi-ballad-like ‘Arching Wings’ which is catchy as hell, but as heavy and edgy as the storylines in Peppa Pig.

Occasionally, the aggression is increased to include a more vibrant and faster beat from the drums and bass, such as ‘End Of The Line’ for example. But these moments feel like they are the exception rather than the rule, leading to a firm impression in my mind that this album is just too smooth and, dare I say it, safe.

As you all know, I vehemently dislike writing reviews that are anything less than positive. However, if I am to listen to more and more music in order to bring readers as much new material as possible, it is inevitable that this will happen with greater frequency. Nevertheless, I always try to steer away from being negative without being constructive in my criticism. Ultimately, Horizon Ignited’s music found here on ‘Towards The Dying Lands’ may not be to my personal taste, but I’d still urge anyone to give it a listen because the content of this record is professionally crafted and well executed. It might even be your next great discovery.

The Score of Much Metal: 72%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Municipal Waste – Electrified Brain

Paganizer – Behind The Macabre

Philosophobia – Philosophobia

Darkane – Inhuman Spirits

Exocrine – The Hybrid Suns

Fallen Sanctuary – Terranova

Deathwhite – Grey Everlasting

Charlie Griffiths – Tiktaalika

Seven Kingdoms – Zenith

Brutta – Brutta

White Ward – False Light

Winds Of Tragedy – As Time Drifts Away

Tim Bowness – Butterfly Mind

Denouncement Pyre – Forever Burning

Truent – Through The Vale Of Earthly Torment

Wind Rose – Warfront

Kardashev – Liminal Rite

Artificial Brain -Artificial Brain

Seventh Wonder – The Testament

Kreator – Hate Über Alles

All Things Fallen – Shadow Way

Def Leppard – Diamond Star Halos

Lord Belial – Rapture

Buried Realm – Buried Realm

Stiriah – …Of Light

Remains Of Destruction – New Dawn

Crematory – Inglorious Darkness

IATT – Magnum Opus

Iris Divine – Mercurial

Decapitated – Cancer Culture

Bekmørk – The Path Nocturnal

Septic Flesh – Modern Primitive

Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses

Drift Into Black – Earthtorn

Spheric Universe Experience – Back Home

Outshine – The Awakening

Cosmic Putrefaction – Crepuscular Dirge For The Blessed Ones

Zero Hour – Agenda 21

Scitalis – Doomed Before Time

Morgue Supplier – Inevitability

Visions Of Atlantis – Pirates

Evergrey – A Heartless Portrait (The Orphean Testament)

OU – One

Haunter – Discarnate Ails

Aara – Triade II: Hemera

Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Paganizer – Behind The Macabre – Album Review

Artist: Paganizer

Album Title: Behind The Macabre

Label: Transcending Obscurity Records

Date of Release: 24 June 2022

Welcome one and all to another instalment of ‘Matt drops the ball’, or as I prefer to call it, my review of Swedish death metal stalwarts Paganizer’s twelfth full length release, ‘Behind The Macabre’. It feels like the more music I review, the more I need to discover, because more and more, I notice great big gaping holes in my knowledge and appreciation of heavy metal in all its forms. Admittedly, straight-up brutal death metal is always going to throw up plenty of examples given my relatively recent conversion to the genre, but to know almost nothing of a band that has been around since 1998 and have a back catalogue longer than my arm is more than a little chastening. Turn it around, though, and the positive is that I have another clear candidate to be explored and added to my album collection.

Enough of that though – let’s get down to business and talk about the latest album to emerge from Sweden at the hands of Rogga Johansson (vocals and guitars), Matthias Fiebig (drums), Martin Klasén (bass), and Kjetil Lynghaug (lead guitars). And what a great beast ‘Behind The Macabre’ is. If, like me, you’re a fan of dirty and pulverising death metal that’s loosely based on the ‘Stockholm sound’ and is blessed with some gnarly riffs and just the right amount of well-placed melody and groove, then pay attention because you won’t want to miss this.

The moment that the spiralling leads duel with a heavy, dirty riff and uncompromising rhythm section within the opening seconds of ‘Down The Path Of Decay’, you can tell this could be a really fun ride. The vocals of Rogga Johansson are deliciously deep and gravelly, just as the ugly music demands, but the pace of the song is varied, from fast sections to more measured and slower groovy parts. And even though the pace never reaches the warp speed seen with other bands within the death metal scene, it’s never meant to. Instead, the angle of attack is in the depravity of the material, as well as the pulverising strength.

Mind you, ‘Left Behind To Rot’ is a generally faster track, full of energetic drumming and fast-picked riffs that come close to knocking on the door of the black metal scene. But again, the pace is cleverly varied, and whether fast or slow, the song is laced with a surprising amount of catchy melody to counteract the heaviness. There’s almost none of that to be found on the hilariously named ‘Meatpacker’ which decides to just pummel us into the ground with sheer strength of the riff and blast beats. Nevertheless, I love the end product because it’s just so unapologetically brutal and groovy in a steamroller kind of way.

If there’s a negative, it’s that there are what feels to be a couple of fillers at the heart of the album, or at least a couple of songs that don’t hit the mark quite as powerfully as others; to call anything a filler on an album as strong overall as this feels perhaps a bit unfair.

Unsurprisingly, my favourite tracks are those that dabble with a little more melody, such as the excellent ‘Sleepwalker’. It batters my ears with a frenzied double-pronged attack of drums and guitars at the beginning before injecting a lot more atmosphere, albeit dark and evil atmosphere which feels intense and claustrophobic. But the melodic lead guitar solo that pierces through the gloom alongside a more upbeat and catchier riff is marvellous.

The closing stages in particular of ‘Raving Rhymes Of Rot’ bring with them a whole heap of enjoyment in the form of rampaging melodies alongside the naked aggression of Paganizer’s more standard death metal depravity. ‘Menschenfresser’ by contrast delivers all of the groove in a song that’s pulverising, but a whole heap of fun too, whether or not it is meant to be ‘fun’.

The unequivocal star of the show, however, is the fantastic ‘You Are What You Devour’. Purists may argue that this song sees Paganizer pushing the envelope too far, but I would disagree for what it’s worth. None of the sheer power and menace is lost, as large portions of this song seeks to attack the listener with ferocity. But this is blended with far and away the most melodic and earworm laden material to be found on ‘Behind The Macabre’. It even features a key change for added potency, whilst the lead guitar melodies overlaying a chugging riff near the end are utterly delicious, especially when blended with a blood curdling scream from Johansson.

If all of this wasn’t enough, the final track on the album, ‘Unpeaceful End’ features a guest vocal appearance from Bolt Thrower’s Karl Willets. It’s a fitting collaboration because the unmistakeable tone of Willets’ growl dovetails perfectly with what is a much slower, more doom-infused death metal stomper of a track that’s also the longest single composition on the entire album.

I fully appreciate that dirty and gruesome death metal won’t be to everyone’s taste, but then what’s new at manofmuchmetal.com hey? I like to bring readers a bit of everything that I like, so expect the beautiful and the ugly to mingle side-by-side. If you’re a fan of the more extreme side of the heavy metal spectrum, I can highly recommend this latest effort from Paganizer because ‘Behind The Macabre’ is a truly excellent album that hits the sweet spot between old school brutality and memorable songwriting. I just wish that I’d dived into death metal more deeply in years gone by because it feels more and more that I missed out on some great bands and super music. Better late than never though, and I’m delighted to have finally joined the Paganizer fan club.

The Score of Much Metal: 91%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Philosophobia – Philosophobia

Darkane – Inhuman Spirits

Exocrine – The Hybrid Suns

Fallen Sanctuary – Terranova

Deathwhite – Grey Everlasting

Charlie Griffiths – Tiktaalika

Seven Kingdoms – Zenith

Brutta – Brutta

White Ward – False Light

Winds Of Tragedy – As Time Drifts Away

Tim Bowness – Butterfly Mind

Denouncement Pyre – Forever Burning

Truent – Through The Vale Of Earthly Torment

Wind Rose – Warfront

Kardashev – Liminal Rite

Artificial Brain -Artificial Brain

Seventh Wonder – The Testament

Kreator – Hate Über Alles

All Things Fallen – Shadow Way

Def Leppard – Diamond Star Halos

Lord Belial – Rapture

Buried Realm – Buried Realm

Stiriah – …Of Light

Remains Of Destruction – New Dawn

Crematory – Inglorious Darkness

IATT – Magnum Opus

Iris Divine – Mercurial

Decapitated – Cancer Culture

Bekmørk – The Path Nocturnal

Septic Flesh – Modern Primitive

Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses

Drift Into Black – Earthtorn

Spheric Universe Experience – Back Home

Outshine – The Awakening

Cosmic Putrefaction – Crepuscular Dirge For The Blessed Ones

Zero Hour – Agenda 21

Scitalis – Doomed Before Time

Morgue Supplier – Inevitability

Visions Of Atlantis – Pirates

Evergrey – A Heartless Portrait (The Orphean Testament)

OU – One

Haunter – Discarnate Ails

Aara – Triade II: Hemera

Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Darkane – Inhuman Spirits – Album Review

Artist: Darkane

Album Title: Inhuman Spirits

Label: Massacre Records

Date of Release: 24 June 2022

Ever since I discovered ‘Expanding Senses’ back in 2002 or thereabouts, I have had a soft spot for Swedish band Darkane. At a time when I was still very heavily into exploring everything that the melodic death metal genre had to offer, I stumbled across their third album and never looked back. What attracted me to Darkane was the fact that they were always just a little bit different from everyone else in the densely populated scene. Whilst others were experimenting with loads of clean vocals, going ultra-melodic, or completely the opposite direction, here was a band that had a much more pronounced thrash metal element to their output, alongside some great riffs, and savagery blended with a sense of the epic and grandiose. I also liked the vaguely progressive edge that they had, meaning that you had to work a little harder to fully appreciate their output. To me, this was a great mix which led to my becoming a firm fan of the quintet.

And then, after they released album number six, ‘The Sinister Supremacy’ in 2013, everything went very quiet. And it isn’t clear why. But no matter, because 2022 is the year that Darkane have retuned, and I for one am happy about this. With one of the most stable line-ups in extreme metal, the original core quartet who came together in 1998 remain present and correct. This means that the guitars are handled by Klas Ideberg and Christofer Malmström, Jörgen Löfberg is the bassist, and Peter Wildoer remains on the drum stool. The vocalist is the only person that has changed over the years, but original singer Lawrence Mackrory fronts ‘Inhuman Spirits’, his second album appearance since his return in 2011.

After such a prolonged hiatus, their return could have gone one of several ways. The resultant album could have been a pale shadow of their past offerings, it could have seen their modus operandi change with a pronounced identity shift, or the quintet could have come back hungrier than ever, or with no real appreciable change to their core identity. Thankfully, it is the latter that has transpired, and this has made me even happier.

It takes precisely 2.5 seconds before I start to smile. The opening song is also the title track and in classic Darkane style, it comes roaring out of the blocks with intensity, heaviness, and a grandiose bombast that only they can deliver. The drums mete out a punishing beat, ably assisted by a rumbling bass and strong riffs, all coated in some excellent, rich orchestration. Darkane are back, peeps! From there, Lawrence Mackrory takes centre stage with his familiar aggressive, gritty, snarling delivery whilst the energetic hybrid of death and thrash metal alongside him cuts and scythes with precise intensity. The chorus, however, when it arrives, is a magnificent thing of thunderous and melodic beauty. It takes a few spins to fully make its mark, but when it lodges itself in your brain, it will not let go.

Up next is ‘Awakening’ and whilst it is still unmistakeably Darkane, the approach is slightly different. It’s much more death metal-centric, with Mackrory unleashing a deeper growl that is less decipherable. That is, until the chorus, which is a stomping, groove-laden beast that builds upon the far less orchestrated, and far more muscular, chunky riff-laden affair that you hear in the verses. As the song develops, there’s a return to the cleaner vocals, plus there’s a large dollop of melody within the lead guitar solos that emerge later in the track.

The more I listen to ‘Inhuman Spirits’, the more I come to the conclusion that the album could very well be neatly split into two halves. Opener aside, the first few songs feel a little more spiky, incisive, and aggressive; there is still melody and groove, of that there’s no doubt, but the songs feel a little more confrontational and extreme, if I can use that descriptor. The second half however, is markedly more catchy and more melodic overall. Unless my ears are playing tricks on me of course.

And then track five, ‘Inhaling Mental Chaos’ kicks in. It still deploys a pleasing amount of strong and tight riffs, not sacrificing the heaviness one iota, but after a frenetic introduction, the melody feels more immediate and pronounced. Those that know me will know that this is a very positive thing indeed, so the combination of memorable riffs and melodically tinged cleaner vocals of Mackrory satisfy my needs perfectly. The ensuing lead solos and harmonic leads are delicious too, bringing that wicked smile to my lips once again.

I could pick any number of songs to thrust under the spotlight, but the truth is that ‘Inhuman Spirits’ is a remarkably consistent creation, with not one of the ten songs falling short, not even the slightly strange and unexpected final instrumental that’s just piano and atmospherics to end the record in moody fashion. It won’t be everyone’s preferred way of ending the album, but thanks to the darkness and the melancholy within the central melody, I rather like it.

Back to the heavier songs though, and ‘Mansion Of Torture’ is a snarling, frothing monster of a track that blends savagery and attitude with a huge chorus that once again sees some pronounced symphonic orchestration to inject that sense of majestic opulence to the material, culminating in a full-on cinematic film score outro.

In a slight change of pace, the intro to ‘The Quintessence Of…’ is a much slower affair, that shows the way in which Darkane can, if the need arises, offer a sense of more measured drama and slow build to their material. I love the way that the music builds from all corners of the band over the course of a minute or more, taking its time to come to full fruition. Whilst the pace does quicken slightly within the verses, it is a slower-paced composition overall, revelling in a big, grandstand chorus via a wonderfully groovy riff that will test those neck muscles whether or not you want it to. Alongside the title track, this is where Darkane are at their most gloriously epic and it’s at this point that I suddenly realise how much I love this band and how much I have missed them over the past near decade.

‘A Spiral To Nothing’ is a catchy and upbeat song, whose opening riff and melody reminds me a little of Arch Enemy, albeit in their early days when they wrote their best material by a million miles. There’s also a hint of early Megadeth too, particularly in the chorus that mimics the song title by cleverly spiralling down as it goes along. But don’t be fooled, because this is still 100% Darkane.

The only disappointment that I have is that I singularly failed in my attempt to bring this review to you before the album’s release. However, being such an important band for me and many others, and with such expectation after their hiatus, I felt I owed it to Darkane to get this review right, and to give the music as much time to fully resonate as possible. Having done that, I am delighted to be able to say that ‘Inhuman Spirits’ shows that this quintet have lost none of their ability, hunger, or bite. All that remains is my now heightened ambition to see the Swedes on a stage as I’ve never had the pleasure to date. In the meantime, won’t you all please stop what you are doing and wrap your ears around ‘Inhuman Spirits’, as Darkane are well and truly back.

The Score of Much Metal: 94%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Exocrine – The Hybrid Suns

Fallen Sanctuary – Terranova

Deathwhite – Grey Everlasting

Charlie Griffiths – Tiktaalika

Seven Kingdoms – Zenith

Brutta – Brutta

White Ward – False Light

Winds Of Tragedy – As Time Drifts Away

Tim Bowness – Butterfly Mind

Denouncement Pyre – Forever Burning

Truent – Through The Vale Of Earthly Torment

Wind Rose – Warfront

Kardashev – Liminal Rite

Artificial Brain -Artificial Brain

Seventh Wonder – The Testament

All Things Fallen – Shadow Way

Def Leppard – Diamond Star Halos

Lord Belial – Rapture

Buried Realm – Buried Realm

Stiriah – …Of Light

Remains Of Destruction – New Dawn

Crematory – Inglorious Darkness

IATT – Magnum Opus

Iris Divine – Mercurial

Decapitated – Cancer Culture

Bekmørk – The Path Nocturnal

Septic Flesh – Modern Primitive

Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses

Drift Into Black – Earthtorn

Spheric Universe Experience – Back Home

Outshine – The Awakening

Cosmic Putrefaction – Crepuscular Dirge For The Blessed Ones

Zero Hour – Agenda 21

Scitalis – Doomed Before Time

Morgue Supplier – Inevitability

Visions Of Atlantis – Pirates

Evergrey – A Heartless Portrait (The Orphean Testament)

OU – One

Haunter – Discarnate Ails

Aara – Triade II: Hemera

Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Buried Realm – Buried Realm – Album Review

Artist: Buried Realm

Album Title: Buried Realm

Label: Independent Release

Date of Release: 3 June 2022

…‘Embodiment Of The Divine’ is a great record, deservedly raising the stock of the talented Josh Dummer and Buried Realm ever higher. This is one of the best melodic death metal albums I have heard this year, just as the debut was back in 2017. By anyone’s standards, that’s an impressive run of form, one which I hope continues with album number three.

The final words of my review of Buried Realm’s sophomore release are worth restating as album three is now upon us. Self-titled and self-released, ‘Buried Realm’ has a lot to live up to based on my comments, and those of many other metal journalists the world over. However, the mastermind behind Buried Realm and multi-instrumentalist Josh Dummer is not only talented, but he’s also ambitious, driven, and hard-working. That’s a powerful combination in anyone’s language, and so the American has as much chance as anyone.

Aside from the drums that are performed throughout this release by Heikki Saari, Dummer does everything. Guitars, bass, vocals, songwriting; the whole works. That being said, though, the fact that he is once again joined by a cast of guest musicians to sprinkle their own magic into the mix, only helps to increase the sense of expectation around this release, for me anyway. Bob Katsionis (Serious Black, ex-Firewind), Christian Münzner (Obscura, Alkaloid), Christofer Malmström (Darkane), Christopher Amott (Dark Tranquillity, ex-Arch Enemy), Dan Swanö (Edge Of Sanity, Witherscape), and Dean Arnold (Primalfrost, ex-Vital Remains) all pay a visit to the world that Dummer has created, all adding a little something extra along the way.

I would hazard a guess that Dummer’s primary instrument is almost certainly the guitar, based on the music he creates, his promo photos, and the fact that the vast majority of his chosen guests are known for their prowess with the stringed instrument of the Gods. If you are thus far unfamiliar with Buried Realm, this alone should give you an idea of what you can expect. Call it extreme metal, call it melodic death metal, call it technical death metal, call it anything you want. The bottom line is that each of these descriptors holds a certain amount of accuracy. But more importantly, however you define it, the music seriously shreds. Whether it’s in the form of a neck breaking riff, a clever lick, or a face-melting solo, not a single song goes by when Dummer and friends don’t worship at the altar of the six string.

After a relatively modest, quiet, and melodic intro in the form of ‘Entrance’, ‘Spectral Light’ explodes with real intent. Blastbeats and heavy, sharp riffs are the order of the day here, as Dummer lays down an early marker. His vocals are as caustic as previous albums, whilst a modicum of melody and groove surfaces within the verses. The chorus is reminiscent of the days when Arch Enemy could actually write a memorable song; it’s melodic and catchy, yet it remains a bruising affair with a pummelling rhythm section at its core. The speed at which some of the ensuing riffs are executed is thoroughly impressive, underlining the skill of Dummer perfectly.

Easily the fastest and most intense of all the compositions on this record surfaces in the form of ‘Poison Palace’ which, according to Dummer himself explores the topic of some people becoming dependant upon drugs and other chemical substances. I love the range of vocals used, from the higher-pitched dry approach, to the deep guttural growls which are so satisfying. This track also features one of the most arresting solos heard on this album, a whirlwind of melody and technical dexterity within the confines of one of the harshest songs on offer.

The galloping groove and effervescent lead lines not a million miles from what In Flames would deliver in their heyday create a bit of a false impression on ‘The Iron Flame’. A song about the loss of family and friends, it initially feels too exuberant. But listen more closely and the melodic sensibilities, as well as the wailing, flamboyant leads that feature heavily hide a vague note of melancholy too, a bittersweet note to what is one of my personal favourite tracks on ‘Buried Realm’. The guitar work is insane and when it finally calms at the end, the synths bathe the closing moments in a reflective sense of calm.

Speaking of synths, the introduction to ‘Witch Bones’ is dominated by them, but more of a theatrical tinkling than anything else. Enhancing the lyrical content that explores themes of human temptation towards evil, it’s a shorter, snappier composition that is no less bruising for its brevity. Those with a soft spot for the deep grorls of Dan Swanö will swoon over ‘Where The Armless Phantoms Glide’, a preposterously named song that sees the guest duet with Dummer to great effect, whilst once again, we’re treated to guitar gymnastics all over the place. Particularly enjoyable are the muscular riffs and the bold cinematic synths that come to the fore in the latter stages of the song to counteract the more sci-fi inspired sounds that also lurk within.

One of my other firm favourites however, has to be ‘Elder Gods’. As I’m always at pains to admit, I’m a sucker for melody and this song produces some of the strongest and most enjoyable on this record. The chorus to this beast is groovy and catchy which, in turn, makes it one of the most fun sounding in my eyes. My head nods, my air guitar makes an appearance, and I smile broadly as the track unfolds. The great thing about it though, is that for all the melody, the heaviness and intensity is never compromised; instead, the two elements compliment each other very well indeed.

This self-titled record then ends with a cover of ‘He’s Back (The Man Behind The Mask)’ by Alice Cooper. Whether deliberate or not, I get a hint of Children of Bodom in this track due to the chosen synth sounds. To be perfetly honest, it’s a fascinating rendition because were I not already familiar with the original, I’d not have realised it was a cover.

The only way to conclude this review is to return to the beginning and again reference my review of ‘Embodiment Of The Divine’. At the time, I expressed my hopes that the third Buried Realm album would continue an impressive run of form. As it turns out, Josh Dummer has gone one better, by creating his best body of work yet. It’s often the way that artists will self-title a record that they feel immensely proud of, and that tradition continues here. ‘Buried Realm’ is chock full of all the things you want from this entity: technicality, aggression, and melody, with plenty of guitar histrionics to top it all off. But, you also need good songs and, on that score, there are absolutely no complaints from me. In short, Buried Realm have never sounded better.

The Score of Much Metal: 92%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Stiriah – …Of Light

Remains Of Destruction – New Dawn

Crematory – Inglorious Darkness

IATT – Magnum Opus

Iris Divine – Mercurial

Decapitated – Cancer Culture

Bekmørk – The Path Nocturnal

Septic Flesh – Modern Primitive

Blut Aus Nord – Disharmonium – Undreamable Abysses

Drift Into Black – Earthtorn

Spheric Universe Experience – Back Home

Outshine – The Awakening

Cosmic Putrefaction – Crepuscular Dirge For The Blessed Ones

Zero Hour – Agenda 21

Scitalis – Doomed Before Time

Morgue Supplier – Inevitability

Visions Of Atlantis – Pirates

Evergrey – A Heartless Portrait (The Orphean Testament)

OU – One

Haunter – Discarnate Ails

Aara – Triade II: Hemera

Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle – EP Review

Artist: Haunted By Silhouettes

Album Title: No Man Isle

Label: Eclipse Records

Date of Release: 6 May 2022

As many of you will know all too well, I tend to write long reviews that go into some detail about the release I’m faced with. However, given that this EP lasts for just 16 minutes, I shall try my best to match that brevity here. The EP is entitled ‘No Man Isle’, and it comes from a Norwegian entity by the name of Haunted By Silhouettes.

What surprised me when I carried out my research, was that Haunted By Silhouettes have been around for nearly a decade. I thought that this EP might be one of their first but, as it turns out, it is their third EP to go alongside two full-length albums released so far. I’ve obviously been asleep at the wheel when it comes to this band, especially as they offer a rather palatable brand of melodic death metal, if ‘No Man Isle’ is anything to go by.

Comprised of vocalist Mathias Jamtli Rye, guitarists Per Kristian Grimsland and Stian Hoel Fossen, bassist Ola Nilsen Kjøren, and drummer Håvard Bustad, the quintet caught my ear immediately when I took an early exploratory listen. ‘No Man Isle’ may only be comprised of four full tracks and an intro piece which are gone in the blink of an eye, but it’s a really satisfying blink that’s for sure.

What I really enjoy about the music on ‘No Man Isle’ is the way that the quintet have found a good blend of old and new. The core of the band’s sound is clearly inspired by the ‘Gothenburg sound’ of the 90s, but they ensure that the songs remain relevant two or three decades later by adding a more modern edge, created through the use of synths and electronic sounds. But it’s not overdone in my opinion, so that the resultant music avoids feeling soulless.

If I did have a slight criticism though, it would be a slightly strange one. As I listen, I can’t help but feel that the music is almost too smooth, too polished, and too ‘nice’. The melodies within this EP are memorable and catchy, whilst the production is powerful and meaty. But, to be critical, melodic or not, this is death metal and there is a lack of an edge at times, which can often add another dimension to this kind of music.

But it’s a minor niggle, and aside from that, there’s not much else to bemoan.  The intro piece, ‘Departure’ is over in a flash of synths and electronics, to be replaced by a hard-hitting slab of melodic death metal courtesy of ‘Flock’, complete with memorable riffs, a satisfying growl, and powerful drumming. The chorus allows the synths to come to the fore, as the melodies make their mark. I do get mid-era In Flames echoes here, but it comes with enough of their own ingredients, that the similarities are not too overpowering.

‘Selkie’ dials back the heaviness slightly and has more of a quasi-ballad feel despite the deep growls, and features the huge talents of Bjorn ‘Speed’ Strid of Soilwork and The Night Flight Orchestra to lend his clean vocals to the chorus. If you’re a Speed fan, this song will be irresistible to you, as it is to me, although the chorus is not quite as electric as it’s predecessor if I’m being entirely honest.

The most aggressive song on ‘Ni Man Isle’ has to be ‘Icon’, which bursts out of the speakers with barely controlled intent, and features the dirtiest riffs on this EP. Again, though, the chorus is smooth, synth-bathed, and melodic, meaning that it isn’t difficult to really warm to. There’s even room for a quit synth-led cinematic section towards the end.

And finally, we’re faced with the title track, which has a demonstrable Nordic folk feel to it. The pace is slowed, the melodies are more elegant and flowing, and there’s even an appearance from what sounds like an accordion. I wasn’t expecting this, but oddly, it works, adding a different vibe to what is a more nuanced and intriguing track overall.

Based on the content of ‘No Man Isle’, I wish it was longer, much longer. That in itself should demonstrate to you how much I like the music from Haunted By Silhouettes here. It may be a short and snappy affair, but the Norwegians make the very most of it and, in so doing, have made me sit up and take notice of a band that I previously knew nothing about. My appetite has been well and truly whetted for their next release, one for which I will keep an eager eye open. I tried to be brief, I really did!

The Score of Much Metal: 85%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron – Album Review

Artist: Dragonbreed

Album Title: Necrohedron

Label: MDD Records

Date of Release: 22 April 2022

You may not have heard of the band at the heart of this review, but if you are familiar with the names Suidakra or Graveworm, then you may wish to stick with me for a while. And that’s because Dragonbreed are an amalgam of the two entities, created to offer a platform for music written during the most recent Suidakra writing sessions that didn’t fit that album, ‘Wolfbite’. Vocalist/guitarist Arkadius ‘Akki’ Antonik pulled together his Suidakra bandmates Sebastian Jensen and Ken Jentzen, former bassist Christoph ‘Zachi’ Zacharowski, and Graveworm vocalist Stefano Fiori to create Dragonbreed, almost certainly named after a Suidakra song from their 2000 release, ‘Arcanum’.

‘Necrohedron’, with its arresting cover artwork, is the result of their endeavours. It’s just shy of 38 minutes long and consists of eight individual tracks that harken back to the heyday of melodic death metal. And when I say that, I’m of course referring to the mid-late 90s when the scene was awash with superb bands creating even better music. That said, Dragonbreed don’t just spend their time worshiping at the altar of the Gothenburg greats; there is a lot of that style to be heard naturally, but there is enough variety spread across the album to ensure that the music remains relevant and interesting in the modern day. I was impressed from the first listen, but my enjoyment has increased further, the more I listen to it.

If I can get the negatives out of the way first, before extolling its virtues, I find that ‘Necrohedron’ runs out of steam a little towards the end. Or, to put it another way, the best material is very much front-loaded. The album packs a massive punch early on but struggles a little to maintain the high standards for the entire record. I also think that Dragonbreed do need to settle on an identity that is more their own; it remains to be seen whether this venture will be a one-off, but if they are to return, then they need to bring with them something a little more unique to help them stand out from the pack within what is, a very competitive scene.

Enough of the negatives though, because I want to explore all that is good about Dragonbreed and ‘Necrohedron’. And this is relatively easy because you could pick any one of the opening five or so tracks and be hit with something that’s worthy of the entrance fee.

Predictably, I’m going to start with the opening composition, ‘The Undying’ because, for my money, it’s quite possibly the best of the bunch, beginning the record with a real bang and a statement of genuine intent. There’s barely any kind of intro to speak of before we’re pinned to the wall by a ferocious blast of heaviness, complete with deep growls, frenetic drums, and sharp riffs. The melody comes in after a while, but it doesn’t dilute the brutality or the intensity of the track, it enhances it. Early In Flames and Dark Tranquillity are immediate reference points, made all the more prominent by a lovely acoustic guitar interlude. This was a staple of a lot of early 90s melodic death metal, and I’m a real sucker for it if I’m honest. I love the way that the heaviness gradually increases around it, I also quite like the spoken-word element too.

With my interest fully captured, ‘Summoning The Arcane’ goes all-out to keep it. It’s a muscular, no-nonsense affair, with chunky riffs, meaty rhythms, and melodies that are catchy, but not overly saccharine either. In seeking to remain relevant in the modern world, there’s a very slight nod to the ‘core’ lovers out there thanks to a beefy closing riff, but it’s done tastefully and with style.

I love the dark, dramatic opening to ‘The World Beyond’, which gives way to a pleasing mid-tempo stomp, but delivered with understated flair. It’s a song that gets the neck muscles moving, and again, there are some nice melodies to be heard, giving it an immediacy. What I wasn’t expecting was the part that’s just bass accompanied by a slightly cleaner, snarled vocal. The bass is dirty and has a thrash edge to it which is cool, and it demonstrates a willingness to explore different ideas, something that’s perhaps easier for a new band than an established act with a clear modus operandi.

The final couple of minutes of ‘Sinister Omen’ are marvellous too. The main body of the song is very solid, but the melody is suddenly increased in the latter stages, only to be replaced by another gorgeous acoustic section with more spoken-word embellishment that ends up seeing the song to its conclusion. Those of us of a certain vintage have got to like the very subtle hint to At The Gates with the feedback/amp sounds that usher in ‘Offerings From Yonder’. Whether or not this was intentional, it’s a nice touch for sure.

Aside from the fact that the final couple of tracks don’t quite hit the mark with me as strongly as the earlier material, there’s really not very much that I can find fault with here. Dragonbreed is a band that, on the strength of ‘Necrohedron’, I fervently hope is not neglected in the years to come. Naturally the protagonists’ ‘main’ bands of Suidakra and Graveworm will come first, but it would be a crying shame if we never get to hear some new old-school melodic death metal done the Dragonbreed way, especially if it builds upon these solid foundations, of which I’m sure they are entirely capable.

The Score of Much Metal: 88%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Credic – Vermillion Oceans – Album Review

Artist: Credic

Album Title: Vermillion Oceans

Label: Black Lion Records

Date of Release: 22 April 2022

I’ve never seen a single minute of the TV show ‘Stranger Things’, so when this album is described as “a cross between Gothenburg metal and the score to ‘Stranger Things’”, half of the reference is lost on me. It goes on to suggest that “‘Vermillion Oceans’ sounds like a massive, zeitgeisty metal album taking a stroll through Hawkins, Indiana.” My assumption that Hawkins is the setting for the TV show proved correct on closer inspection, but it still means nothing to me. Hell, I’m neck deep in music reviews for this website, so the chance to indulge in TV binge watching isn’t even an option. I’ve made my bed, so I must now lie in it.

Fortunately, I know my melodic death metal, so the Gothenburg reference pricked up my ears, even if the cover artwork and imagery left me thinking that perhaps the PR company had mixed up the promo blurb with another album, perhaps an 80s tinged Gothic rock record. But no, ‘Vermillion Oceans’ is very much a melodeath album and it comes from the minds of a five-piece from Stuttgart in Germany called Credic. ‘Vermillion Oceans’, as it transpires, is actually their second release and, on balance, it’s not bad at all.

I thought I’d reference the elephant in the room from the outset, and state that this album does sound like it was heavily inspired by the ‘Haven’ era of Dark Tranquillity. So, depending upon your level of appreciation for that kind of output, you’ll either love or loathe ‘Vermillion Oceans’ accordingly. Interestingly, the press release references ‘Haven’ specifically, so this isn’t a case of my ears misbehaving, thankfully. That said, I need to make a further two points before I move on. Firstly, the music is not a complete replica of Dark Tranquillity’s Millennium baby and secondly, neither does this effort quite reach the same standards.

All that being said, ‘Vermillion Oceans’ is still a thoroughly decent slab of melodic death metal, and it does have a few of its own nuances to explore. For a start, some of the material within the music has been given the ‘modern’ treatment, meaning that the songs contain some up-to-date electronic and synths sounds. Take the title track as the example of what I’m getting at. Within the song, there are some bold effects and sounds that are more akin to the ‘modern metal’ sphere, bands like Amaranthe springing to mind immediately. The chorus is catchy and is a fittingly heavy, whilst vocalist Stefan Scheu does a reasonable job at not sounding a million miles away from Michael Stanne, growling deeply and confidently atop the metallic tumult, that veers into vaguely metalcore territory with chugging stop-start riffs from guitarists Andreas Steinle.

Whereas ‘Haven’ typically beat us with track after banging track of short, sharp, melodic intensity, Credic dabble in slightly longer compositions. It’s all relative though, as I’m only talking four-to-five minutes duration, with only three tracks here coming in at the sub-four-minute mark. One of these songs, ‘Darkened Fields’ is an utter delight though, coming in with a catchy lead guitar lick before an immediate melody assaults the ears. The chorus, bathed in bold synths, is driven forcefully by the drum/bass combo of Waldemar Janzen and Martin Stump respectively. Interestingly, it is Janzen who handles the electronics, and, on this song, he excels, creating a rich atmosphere to accompany the melodies.

‘Chosen Ordeal’ on the other hand, is a much more thrash-infused and uncompromising affair with expressive bas lines and guitar riffs that are sharp and which occasionally verge on the discordant to increase the more aggressive side of the band. But at the half-way mark, in marches a brief melodic section to give the song a completely different feel, even if the more extreme instrumentation returns until the end.

To their credit, the quintet are also willing to experiment a bit and on ‘Tethys Mix’, they allow Janzen to stand front and centre, creating a quiet, but brooding and cinematic composition that then brings in really bold electronics later in the piece to add to the introduction of the metallic instruments. I’m not sure it’s my favourite piece, but it shows the intent within the band to not just offer ten identical tracks. Some might shout ‘filler’, but instead I find it an interesting change of pace. Equally worthy of note is the more atmospheric and slightly more progressive sounding ‘Long Street’, which closes the album with some style, despite lacking that standout melody I was hoping for.

Mind you, if you’re looking for melodies, there are lots of places to look here, such as the opener ‘Tides Disharmonized’ which begins so abruptly that you’re left momentarily reeling. But as it settles, in come the synth-soaked riffs and melodic chorus, complete with fast-picked, cold riffing, and an overall presence that is hard not to enjoy, even the unexpected dalliance with Gothic trappings somewhere in the middle. The early groove within ‘The Path’ is delightful too, it must be said, as is the synth-heavy ‘Haven’-esque chorus that cuts through the muscular groove nicely.

Most surprising however, is ‘Autumns Spring’ which manages to blend whimsical and gentle cinematic filmscore-like synths with heavy riffing, and melodic death metal burliness. In fact, if Credic were to follow this path more on their next outing, I’d be all over it like a rash – I really like this song and it’s probably the stand-out track on the album.

Overall, I must conclude that ‘Vermillion Oceans’ is a very decent, enjoyable album. Despite it not being particularly original and lacking that knock-out punch, I have no doubt that it will find favour with fans of the more modern, melodic end of the melodic death metal genre. It is well-crafted, well-performed, and delivers in terms of heaviness and memorability, although I’d have liked even more in terms of anthemic material seeing as the guys are clearly capable of such things. As such, Credic’s sophomore release, ‘Vermillion Oceans’ comes with a recommendation from me – ignore the incongruous cover artwork and take a listen to the music within, safe in the knowledge that it’s pretty darn good.

The Score of Much Metal: 79%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse – Album Review

Artist: Ancient Settlers

Album Title: Our Last Eclipse      

Label: Crusader Records (Golden Robot Global Entertainment)

Date of Release: 1 April 2022

When I was presented with this promo, my first thought when I saw the band name and the artwork was that I’d be taken down a misty, murky path of folk tinged black metal, dark metal, or something relatively Earthy and gloomy at the very least. What I wasn’t expecting was to be thrust neck deep into modern melodic death metal instead. I always like to be surprised, so the initial shock was short lived and I ploughed on regardless, as I do have a soft spot for great melodic death metal.

Formed in 2020, Ancient Settlers is comprised of a multi-national cast, covering the US, Finland, Venezuela, Spain, and Portugal. A sextet, they are formed of Carlos Chiesa-Estomba (guitars), Herman Riera (drums), René González (keyboards/synths), Emmy Reyes (guitars), Antony Hämäläinen (vocals), and Miguel Herrera (bass). I’m not familiar with the band Haboryn, but if you are, you’ll recognise several of these names. Vocalist Hämäläinen has a list of bands to his name, including Crystal Tears, Meridian Dawn, and arguably most famously also had a stint in Nightrage. I think I’m also right in thinking that he may have featured at one time for Amaranthe in their live line-up. Regardless, it’s clear that these guys have some pedigree.

Unfortunately, this debut album, ‘Our Last Eclipse’ is not as good as I hoped it would be if I’m being honest. And there are a few reasons for this. Firstly, I find the material on the album as rather generic and not especially original; I’ve heard music like this many, many times, and despite several runs through, I generally remain a touch underwhelmed by the music. There are some nice catchy melodies at play within some of the choruses and wider compositions, but nothing really stands out to me and clobbers me around the head as I feel this kind of music should do. And the shouty vocals within ‘Memories’ are not my thing at all, and are entirely unnecessary for my taste.

More on the tracks themselves shortly, but the biggest problem with this record is with the production. I fully appreciate that Ancient Settlers came together in a world turned upside-down by the global pandemic which will have made certain tasks a lot more difficult. But ‘Our Last Eclipse’ sounds muddy, indistinct, and worst of all, the vocals are way too far back in the mix. I can’t be the only one to notice this, surely? Maybe I am, maybe it’s my ears. But shouldn’t it be the drums that are situated at the back of the studio, or in a different room, not the vocalist? It’s the impression I get when I listen to this album. In fairness, I get more used to it as the record develops, but it threatens to completely ruin the first impression listeners will get when they hear this band for the first time via opening track, ‘Into The Depths I Ride’.

That said, on a more positive note, I get a bit of a Johan Liiva vibe from vocalist Antony Hämäläinen, although that could be partly down to the production – it’s hard to tell. And that’s a real shame as far as I am concerned.

I want to be more positive however, because there are some strong elements that feature on ‘Our Last Crusade’, including the title track itself. A slower more mid-tempo affair, it is alive with melody and is one of the more memorable songs that I hear here. In fact, I find that Ancient Settlers are actually at their best when they take their foot off the gas and inject more melody. The guys know how to pen a nice melody that’s for sure, and it is this element of their song writing that should be most highly lauded. The faster-paced riffs however, do tend to sound a little samey, although that’s a general gripe I have across the genre with melodeath that’s more metalcore tinged. This is highlighted within ‘Library Of Tears’, another positive composition even if it’s a little long at nearly seven minutes. I like the increased use of synths to add depth, but again, the production could have made them a little more prominent as they can tend to disappear in the mix. When the press release references 80s synthwave as an element of the band’s sound, the lack of clarity with the keys is another misstep unfortunately.

As many of you know, I hate writing reviews that are overly negative because I am generally someone that wants to see the positives in things. Hopefully I have created the balance here between being positive and also honest with my negative comments. There is certainly something there within this band that leads me to believe that a follow-up album could be a lot stronger and more powerful. To do that, Ancient Settlers need a better production across the board, and an injection of something within the music that creates more in the way of their own unique identity. This is easier said than done I know, but if the band can do that, I could see the name Ancient Settlers being spoken a lot more widely in metal circles in years to come.

The Score of Much Metal: 65%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Godless Truth – Godless Truth – Album Review

Artist: Godless Truth

Album Title: Godless Truth

Label: Transcending Obscurity Records

Date of Release: 4 March 2022

I’ll be the first to admit that I am becoming a little addicted to the music that Transcending Obscurity Records have been serving up of late. Admittedly, not all of it is perfect, but the quality is generally very good indeed, especially when you’re going through a period of exploration and love for extreme metal of the more technical death metal variety. This self-titled release from Godless Truth is the fifth album from the label that I’ve reviewed this year so far and we’re barely two whole months into 2022.

Coincidentally, ‘Godless Truth’ is the fifth album of the Czech band’s career, a career that began way back in 1992, but which went through a four-year hiatus between 2012-2016. In fact, ‘Godless Truth’ is the first album from the tech death quintet since they unleashed ‘Arrogance Of Supreme Power’ back in 2004. I’ll be honest and say that I may have crossed paths with Godless Truth in the past, but if I did I can’t remember the occasion. It’s probably best then, to start from scratch and treat this album as my first proper exposure to the band.

And this stance is probably best, because more than half of the band are new members, joining in 2017. In fact, guitarist Petr Švancara is the longest serving musician within the band, having been present since 1994. He is now joined by fellow guitarist Ondřej Černobila, bassist Jakub Grunt, drummer Petr Mikeš, and vocalist Adam B. Sychrow. What they’ve created, however, is easily one of the most wonderfully enjoyable slabs of technical death metal I’ve heard in a while.

Trust me, if you’ve grown tired of some of the ‘normal’ melodeath fare because it’s just a little safe, too melodic, too ‘mainstream’, or whatever, then I suggest you wrap your lugholes around ‘Godless Truth’. There is melody to be heard, but it’s not watered down; instead, it is present within some sharp, abrasive, and extreme death metal, where the musicians can tear your ears apart whilst also making the experience entertaining, and downright catchy in places. Personally, whilst I still enjoy a great deal of melodic death metal, I’m loving this offering, because it’s savage, technically very adept, and it is unexpectedly catchy all at the same time. It’s a neat trick to pull off but Godless Truth have managed it.

Before I delve deeper into the guts of the music, there is a slight gripe that I have, albeit not a dealbreaker by any means. But it’s a little strange to open up the record with a minute-long instrumental intro and then drop another instrumental interlude at track three, after just one blast of the good stuff. The former, ‘Wheels Of Entity’ does little aside from create a dark atmosphere and build the tension a little, whilst ‘Glory To Desperation’, admittedly is more striking thanks to a Dissection-esque acoustic guitar, topped by a melodious lead guitar solo. But it’s an odd decision as far as I’m concerned.

That slight anomaly aside, when I referred to ‘the good stuff’, it kicks off immediately after the intro via ‘The Decision’. The band come out of the traps intent on bludgeoning us with a barrage of strong, heavy riffs, razor-sharp drumming, and a blend of deep growls and shrieks from vocalist Sychrow. But the groove-like intensity comes quickly to the fore whilst blastbeats compete with bruising guitar notes and a gorgeously low bass rumble. The overt melody appears during the lead guitar solos, with both the slightly simpler framework behind them and the solos themselves full of dexterity but with plenty of mellifluous intent too. It’s a winning approach and happily, one that returns at other points within the self-titled record.

‘Scissors’ begins with some flamboyance from all corners, ranging from slightly dissonant leads, to dancing bass, to drumming that offers everything from lightning-fast blasts to more dextrous, flamboyant sticks work. The song is dominated though by punctuations of irresistible groove, led by some properly heavy guitar tones. Like most of the compositions here, the song doesn’t sit still, with a Slayer-like wailing and gnashing lead solo the focal point of the second half alongside a reprise of the opening guitar lead.

Honestly, the more I listen to this record, the more I fall for its charms. It really does capture some of the best bits of heavy music as far as I’m concerned, wrapping them up in a final product that doesn’t lose sight of the central importance of the songs themselves. ‘Breathe Fire’ is much more your classic deathfest in full-on attack mode, but it is executed with a precision that’s highly impressive, giving off the impression that playing this kind of technical brutality is as easy as breathing.

The lead guitar solos within ‘Fortune Time’ are stunning, breathing melody and accessibility where none has a right to exist, let alone thrive. But again, the complexity of the musicianship is not compromised; just take a listen to the bass playing as but one example. I could mention more of the songs, so I will, starting with the frankly superb ‘Bred In Greed’ with more memorable lead guitar mastery, moving on to the groove-heavy ‘The Eyechain’, and ending with the final track ‘Wake Up To Obey’. Here, Godless Truth initially slow things down to create a lumbering beast before stabbing that same beast in the backside and watching him run amok at times at warp speed.  

You will hopefully have cottoned on by now to the fact that I really like ‘Godless Truth’ by the band of the same name. The Czech quintet have not only grabbed my attention, but they have also held my attention, quickly turning it into admiration. And now, as I write this review, listening for the umpteenth time, I have a feeling that admiration is turning into love. Strong words, but words that befit such a strong album, one that has managed to blend my love of complexity, brutality and melody into a eminently listenable feast for the ears. Admittedly it is still early days, but as it stands, this is easily my personal favourite straight-up technical death metal release of 2022.  

The Score of Much Metal: 93%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

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