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Orden Ogan – Gunmen – Album Review

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Artist: Orden Ogan

Album Title: Gunmen

Label: AFM Records

Date of Release: 7 July 2017

This is getting embarrassing. Over the past couple of decades, I have built up what I would like to think is a fairly extensive and varied knowledge of vast swathes of the heavy metal world, even occasionally veering into rockier territories where appropriate. However, it wasn’t until I started writing music reviews for myself rather than a national publication that I have begun to realise how much more there is out there that has completely eluded me. It’s actually quite staggering and a little overwhelming if I’m honest.

And today, I bring you the latest band that has been a completely new revelation for me, namely Orden Ogan. I am familiar with the power metal and melodic metal genres, liking much within them. But German outfit Orden Ogan never crossed my path. Until now.

But hey, I thought, it’s not like they have been around for that long, is it? Oh, 20 years? Damn. Three demos and five previous studio albums? Damn and drat. Oh well, let’s not dwell on my failings, let me try to put things straight at the earliest opportunity, for Orden Ogan have made an impression on me that is extremely positive.

Based on the evidence of ‘Gunmen’, the Teutonic quartet comprised of guitarist/lead vocalist and last-remaining founding member Sebastian ‘Seeb’ Levermann, guitarist Tobias Kersting, bassist Niels Löffler and drummer Dirk Meyer-Berhorn are likely to quickly become a firm favourite of mine in the power metal world. Naturally, genre pigeon-holing can be precarious but Orden Ogan are easier than most; this is unashamed power metal with all the trimmings and a few fleeting elements of other influences, namely folk metal and symphonic metal.

What hits me right off the bat with the dark Wild West-themed ‘Gunmen’ more than anything else, is the way in which they create genuinely epic-sounding music. More specifically, it is the choruses on this album that make the biggest impact. And it’s an immediate impact. Some bands will pretend to create bombastic and epic music but Orden Ogan properly succeed. Layers of keyboards, synths and choirs combine with the more metallic aspects of their sound to produce a soundtrack that is rousing and one that cannot fail to stir even the coldest of hearts. The choruses throughout this record are huge, addictive beasts that I have listened to on repeat several times without them losing any of their ardour. In fact, in many cases, they just get better.

The opening one-two comprised of the title track and ‘Fields Of Sorrow’ is easily one of the most powerful and attention-grabbing beginnings to a record that I have heard from a power metal band in many a year. ‘Gunman’ is a highly-charged thrill-ride from the opening hefty guitar notes and orchestration, right through to the sound of a firing gun to signal its end. In between, we get a combination of stomping and galloping metal riffs, melodic lead guitar licks, a ferocious rhythmic backbone and one of the biggest and most glorious choruses you’ll hear for quite some time. I adore the groove that accompanies the chorus and even the ubiquitous lead guitar solos that crop up toward the end are a great blend of shred and melody. Atop it all are Levermann’s vocals, which I am drawn to thanks to his gritty and deep tones.

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By contrast, ‘Fields Of Sorrow’ is a much darker number and generally more mid-tempo than its predecessor. It kicks off with a seriously cool riff that reinforces my opinion that this record is blessed with some superb guitar tones and a production that more than adequately does it justice. Once again, the chorus is where the music goes from great to sensational. It is a sombre affair but remains highly addictive and huge in scope. The pummelling double-pedal drumming that underpins the chorus is a lovely touch, too, adding further gravitas to proceedings.

It would be difficult for most bands to follow up such an impressive opening and indeed, if I’m being completely honest, I’m still of the opinion that these two cuts, aside from the final song ‘Finis Coronat Opus’ are the strongest on ‘Gunman’. However, what follows is still very good indeed and almost all of the eight subsequent songs have something about them that warrants my admiration. I dismissed ‘Vampire In Ghost Town’ out of hand on a first listen because it came across as just a little too cheesy and the lyrics felt a little silly. But now, I can’t help but love it, principally because, despite the silliness, it remains a well-crafted heavy metal song with meaty riffs, catchy melodies and yet more powerhouse rhythmic flair, a strong recurring feature throughout the album.

The soothing, acoustic opening of ‘Come With Me To The Other Side’ is accented by the soft tones of ex- Leaves Eyes vocalist Liv Kristine, who appears at points elsewhere within a song that has a balladic feel to it, but does not dial down the bombast and metallic elements to compensate. Instead, it becomes a bona-fide symphonic anthem, with a vaguely progressive edge given its many varied components.

It is this variety overall that makes ‘Gunman’ such a rewarding listen and one that doesn’t quickly become one-dimensional and boring. The output remains firmly in the power metal camp, but within this framework, I get the impression that the quartet wanted to experiment a little bit. As such, in addition to the aforementioned tracks, we get s like ‘Down Here (Wanted: Dead Or Alive)’ with its dramatic cinematic overtones and the brooding, stomp of ‘One Last Chance’, where the heaviness is marked and wouldn’t be out of place in other more extreme metal genres. It goes without saying that the chorus is another delicious affair here too.

Closing track, ‘Finis Coronat Opus’ is the longest on ‘Gunman’, nearly nudging the nine-minute mark. Personally, I can’t think of a better way for Orden Ogan to end this epic record, than with their most epic composition. It plays around with light and shade and pacing to great effect, injecting just a touch of prog and then dials everything else up to 11. The chorus is gargantuan, the riffs are superb and the bombastic symphonic elements are a real joy. There’s a sombre tone to the song but a sense of hope and positivity comes through as it draws to a close.

There is no doubt in my mind that ‘Gunmen’ will end the year as one of my favourite power metal albums. It exudes quality from every pore and has been a genuine revelation for me. I will explore the back catalogue for sure but for now, I just need to prise ‘Gunmen’ out of my stereo…and that might prove harder than I first thought.

The Score of Much Metal: 8.75

If you’ve enjoyed this review, you can check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

Iced Earth – Incorruptible
Anathema – The Optimist
Solstafir – Berdreyminn
Dream Evil – Six
Avatarium – Hurricanes And Halos
Ayreon – The Source
Until Rain – Inure
MindMaze – Resolve
God Dethroned – The World Ablaze
Bjorn Riis – Forever Comes To An End
Voyager – Ghost Mile
Big Big Train – Grimspound
Lonely Robot – The Big Dream
Firespawn – The Reprobate
Ancient Ascendant
Pyramaze – Contingent
Shores Of Null – Black Drapes For Tomorrow
Asira – Efference
Hologram Earth – Black Cell Program
Damnations Day – A World Awakens
Memoriam – For The Fallen
Pallbearer – Heartless
Sleepmakeswaves – Made of Breath Only
Ghost Ship Octavius – Ghost Ship Octavius
Vangough – Warpaint
Telepathy – Tempest
Obituary – Obituary
Fen – Winter
Havok – Conformicide
Wolfheart – Tyhjyys
Svart Crown – Abreaction
Nova Collective – The Further Side
Immolation – Atonement
The Mute Gods – Tardigrades Will Inherit The Earth
Ex Deo – The Immortal Wars
Pyogenesis – A Kingdom To Disappear
My Soliloquy – Engines of Gravity
Nailed To Obscurity – King Delusion
Helion Prime – Helion Prime
Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day

Anathema – The Optimist – Album Review

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Artist: Anathema

Album Title: The Optimist

Label: Kscope

Date of Release: 9 June 2017

Anathema is one of my top 5 bands of all time. As such, their new full-length release, ‘The Optimist’ is easily my most highly anticipated album release of 2017.

Put simply, Anathema are a band that speaks to me. They are a band that seem to know instinctively how to press my buttons and touch me whatever my mood. From euphoric and uplifting, to fragile and poignant, they cover the gamut of emotions, leaving me exhilarated one minute and sombre the next, frequently with tears as my constant and ubiquitous silent companion.

I have always liked Anathema, discovering the Liverpudlians via the magnificent ‘Eternity’, back in 1996 as a teenager. However, it was with 2010’s ‘We’re Here Because We’re Here’ and 2012’s ‘Weather Systems’ that my admiration grew into a full-blown love affair, further cemented by ‘Distant Satellites’ in 2014.

To some extent, timing was everything. ‘We’re Here Because We’re Here’ was born less than two years after the heartbreaking passing of my younger brother. And so, when the song ‘Presence’ delivers the spoken word lines of ‘Life is not the opposite of death. Death is the opposite of birth. Life is eternal’ atop a gorgeously ethereal soundscape, I was floored. I know it sounds nonsensical but I felt like Anathema knew me and had put this into the album just for me to help ease my own inner turmoil.

‘Weather Systems’ was released just two years later. Stronger human beings might have moved on from personal tragedy better than I but truth be told, I was still struggling. As such, when I heard ‘Internal Landscapes’ with another powerful spoken word intro delivered by a man who had suffered a near-death experience, I was hit once again. Was this written for me? Of course not, but the conflicting emotions that it stirred in me made me think so. From despair at my loss to the comfort of gaining a little insight into what my brother might have felt as he slipped from us, this masterpiece within Anathema’s undeniable tour-de-force continues to have a huge and lasting impact.

And then, if that wasn’t enough, along came ‘Distant Satellites’ in 2014. I had the pleasure of meeting and interviewing Daniel and Vincent prior to its release. The guys graciously listened to my babblings as I tried to ineloquently describe the importance of their music to me. To my eternal gratitude, the brothers then gave me the gift of a whole new perspective on ‘The Lost Song, Part 2’. Already an achingly gorgeous song, their words made this composition even more important, further cementing the bond between Anathema, my brother and me.

Given all this history, it is very difficult for me to remain entirely objective where Anathema is concerned. And naturally my expectations will be massive ahead of the release of any new material.

And, to begin with, I struggled with ‘The Optimist’, the eleventh album of the Liverpudlian’s career. Never ones to shy away from experimentation, ‘The Optimist’ is yet another shift in Anathema’s own personal evolution. Whilst the core ingredients of atmosphere, emotional depth and lyrical eloquence are present and correct here, the output framed loosely by alternative/prog rock, has a much darker feel to it in general. There is also a more pronounced use of loops, electronic sounds and percussion that were hinted at within the title track on ‘Distant Satellites’. If I’m honest, whilst I love that specific track, I had my doubts and concerns should Anathema venture further down this musical avenue.

The fact that they have done just that perhaps explains why my initial thoughts on ‘The Optimist’ were not overly favourable. The selfish side of me wanted ten more close variations of ‘The Lost Song Part 2’ or ‘Internal Landscapes’ and I felt disappointed that together, Vincent Cavanagh (vocals, guitars, keys), Daniel Cavanagh (guitars, keys, vocals), John Douglas (acoustic/electronic percussion), Lee Douglas (vocals), Jamie Cavanagh (bass) and Daniel Cardoso (drums/keyboards) hadn’t indulged me.

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Credit: Caroline Traitler – http://www.carolinetraitler.net

With the benefit of time and perseverance though, I can now admit that it is not the music on ‘The Optimist’ that was at fault, but my own issues, my own limitations and my selfishness. ‘The Optimist’ is not an instant fix, an immediate score of your favourite musical drug. What it is instead, is a multi-layered, multi-faceted record that demands time and effort on behalf of the listener to unlock its true potential. And when it unlocks…wow!

Interestingly the band have married this latest step forward sonically with a thematic step backwards. In 2001, Anathema released an album called ‘A Fine Day To Exit’ which told the story of a man who wanted to escape his life and the modern world. ‘The Optimist’ reprises this story and in so doing, provides closure to a story that was left unfinished. In typical Anathema style however, the conclusion remains deliberately ambiguous, inviting personal interpretation by the listener.

This thematic decision explains the somewhat strange title of the opening track on ‘The Optimist’, namely ’32.63N 117.14W’. These are in fact the co-ordinates for the beach in San Diego where ‘A Fine Day to Exit’ concludes and which, I assume, adorns the cover of that album, a cover that becomes quite emotional with closer scrutiny. I’ll admit that this is in no way my favourite album in the Anathema back catalogue but I had often thought about that cover and the family photo that sits on the dashboard of the empty car wondering how this story ultimately played out. And now I can.

This opener very much has the feel of a concept album introduction. The sound of waves lapping on the shore, footsteps crunching on the beach, a car engine starting and then station-hopping on the car radio. It is more a scene-setter than a piece of music per se but it then segues rather seamlessly into ‘Leaving It Behind’ and we’re off. And we’re off at some pace, because this is a massively up-tempo, loud and abrasive piece of rock music. The electronic aspect is present from the beginning but with a bit of listening, it really enhances the track, adding an interesting slant to the composition, particularly in the brief atmospheric mid-song break down. As the song develops, the intensity increases as guitars begin to build up into walls of jangly sound whilst the drumming from Cardoso is relentless, ably assisted by bassist Jamie Cavanagh. To my mind, it is the perfect way to introduce an album that has deliberately and consciously been recorded ‘live’ in the studio, because the resulting energy is palpable and thoroughly infectious, pulling the listener along for the heady ride immediately.

As ‘Endless Ways’ begins quietly with just a lone piano and plaintive melody, I’m still catching my breath a little. But as Lee Douglas enters the fray for the first time, accented by some lush orchestration, my attention is well and truly undivided. The melodies and angelic vocals are more reminiscent of the last couple of albums, even if Douglas has parked the vibrato which characterised previous performances. Here, as the song majestically builds from humble beginnings into a powerful and heartfelt outpouring of emotions, Lee demonstrates that she is one of the shining lights in rock music today, whilst Anathema demonstrate that they haven’t lost their mercurial spark, whatever I might have first thought. And yes, you guessed it, the tears flow as I find myself being emotionally nourished by the incredibly important rock in my life that is Anathema.

“Hold on, hold on for dear life
And run, and run all night
For you are loved in endless ways
Stay with me, please believe
I can be your memory

My world will never be the same
And my heart is never going to regret
For you are loved in endless ways
Are loved in endless ways”

This wasn’t written for me, just as previous lyrics weren’t. But they could have been. These words resound with me, they touch me and they comfort me.

More piano introduces the title track, but it is Vincent that initially joins in vocally, joined by Lee at times but only fleetingly. Delicate melodies that are pure Anathema begin to work their charm after a few listens and further orchestration embellishments help to propel the song to a new level of sophistication. The track ebbs and flows, toying with the listener’s moods, but as with its predecessor, there is a subtle build-up towards a crescendo where there’s a hint of a wailing guitar in the vein of songs like ‘Anathema’.

‘San Francisco’ is a bit of an odd one. It is an instrumental that is dominated by a rather repetitive yet strangely beguiling melody, a reprise of sorts of ‘Endless Ways’ if I’m not mistaken. It is then accented by atmospheric synths and electronic sounds which help to set a completely different tone, one that I warm to more and more as time goes by.

In keeping with the concept vibe, the sounds of a train in full flight acts as a pause before ‘Springfield’ is introduced, almost shyly and reluctantly via a quiet and delicate guitar melody which is quickly taken up by the piano. Electronic sounds make a subtle return but it is the insistent rhythmic beat that makes the biggest impression in the early stages, driving the song towards what ultimately becomes an imposing wall of post rock-inspired sound led by urgent guitars and topped off by Lee’s serene voice almost pleading to the heavens. The track then falls away to conclude in a minimalist manner accompanied by the sounds of waves, distant sirens and the whispers of a male voice.

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Credit: Caroline Traitler – http://www.carolinetraitler.net

‘Ghosts’ then offers one of the most poignant and immediate melodies on the album which is enhanced by a beautiful string arrangement and a beat that together suggests something reminiscent of a film soundtrack. By contrast, ‘Can’t Let Go’ ups the pace and features arguably Vincent’s strongest performance on the entire record. Once again, drummer Cardoso provides the drive to a track that begins in bold fashion but which builds sublimely through a clever injection of rich and vibrant aural textures.

We return to another snippet of action from the central character before we delve into the murky world of ‘Close Your Eyes’, which evokes images in my mind of a dark and smoky backstreet jazz club. I can appreciate the composition and I don’t dislike it but it is by far and away my least favourite track on the album. The fact that a trumpet plays a significant role no doubt feeds my apathy as I continue to fail to warm to brass of any kind in my music.

Any lingering misgivings are short-lived however as ‘The Optimist’ ends in genuinely commanding fashion courtesy of ‘Wildfires’ and the fittingly-titled epic closer, ‘Back To The Start’.

The former has a dark, eerie tone created by the haunting, echoed vocals of Vincent atop the ubiquitous piano which for large portions of the track delivers something monotone, incessant and deliberately uncomfortable. But it works, as does the controlled explosion of sound before another swift descent into a minimalist, thought-provoking abyss.

The album is then brought to a close by the near 12-minute ‘Back To The Start’ and it is nothing short of magical, the perfect way to round out this impressive body of work. The sound of waves gently lapping onto the beach ushers in an aching and gorgeous melody that, when coupled by some devastatingly honest lyrics, threatens to reduce this grown man to tears yet again. I’m not normally someone who likes choral vocals, especially when they have a vague gospel ‘happy’ feel to them, but here, it just sounds right. Perfect in fact. The combination of voices, orchestration and lyrics as the song builds and ultimately reaches its climax is truly epic and a feeling of barely contained euphoria washes over me, bathing me in a warm glow. It’s all too much, so when the final act of the central character follows, I get tingles, chills and all manner of conflicting emotions.

Once again, Anathema have delivered an album that is more to me than just a collection of beautifully and lovingly-crafted songs. It is an album that lives and breathes. It has a vibrancy, an intense raw honesty and a human depth that many strive to deliver but that very few succeed in achieving. Whether or not it ultimately surpasses the last couple of records in terms of my overall enjoyment, only time will tell. For now though, I am content to lose myself in ‘The Optimist’ via its aural magnificence and the emotional succour that it provides to this fragile and damaged soul.

The Score of Much Metal: 9.5

If you’ve enjoyed this review, you can check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

Solstafir – Berdreyminn
Dream Evil – Six
Avatarium – Hurricanes And Halos
Ayreon – The Source
Until Rain – Inure
MindMaze – Resolve
God Dethroned – The World Ablaze
Bjorn Riis – Forever Comes To An End
Voyager – Ghost Mile
Big Big Train – Grimspound
Lonely Robot – The Big Dream
Firespawn – The Reprobate
Ancient Ascendant
Pyramaze – Contingent
Shores Of Null – Black Drapes For Tomorrow
Asira – Efference
Hologram Earth – Black Cell Program
Damnations Day – A World Awakens
Memoriam – For The Fallen
Pallbearer – Heartless
Sleepmakeswaves – Made of Breath Only
Ghost Ship Octavius – Ghost Ship Octavius
Vangough – Warpaint
Telepathy – Tempest
Obituary – Obituary
Fen – Winter
Havok – Conformicide
Wolfheart – Tyhjyys
Svart Crown – Abreaction
Nova Collective – The Further Side
Immolation – Atonement
The Mute Gods – Tardigrades Will Inherit The Earth
Ex Deo – The Immortal Wars
Pyogenesis – A Kingdom To Disappear
My Soliloquy – Engines of Gravity
Nailed To Obscurity – King Delusion
Helion Prime – Helion Prime
Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day

Avatarium – Hurricanes And Halos – Album Review

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Artist: Avatarium

Album Title: Hurricanes And Halos

Label: Nuclear Blast

Date Of Release: 26 May 2017

‘Hurricanes And Halos’ is the title given to the third studio release from Swedish doomsters Avatarium, a band that was formed in the minds of Leif Edling (Candlemass) and Marcus Jidell (ex-Evergrey, Soen) before becoming a reality in 2012. Their sophomore album, ‘The Girl With The Raven Mask’ was released in 2015 and, quite rightly, it garnered much critical acclaim. If the world was beginning to take notice of Avatarium, this record catapulted the quintet into the full glare of the heavy metal spotlight.

But much has changed in the world of Avatarium since the releae of ‘The Girl With The Raven Mask’. The band is now a sextet of sorts, but the back story is much more complicated than a simple addition to the ranks. Leif Edling has now stepped away from the bass but remains involved and can claim the song writing credits to six of the eight tracks on ‘Hurricanes And Halos’. Into the vacated bass slot therefore, comes Mats Rydström and he is joined by fellow newbie and organ player Rickard Nielsson who has replaced keyboardist Carl Westholm. The rest of the band remains the same however, with co-founder Marcus Jidell on guitars, Jennie-Anne Smith behind the microphone and Lars Sköld on the drums.

Given the comings and goings behind the scenes, it could have been easy for Avatarium to take their eye off the ball and deliver a new album that wasn’t up to the standard of their last. But to think in such a way would be a mistake and would be to do the members of Avatarium a huge disservice. When you have musicians of the calibre of Jidell, Smith and Edling, you’re almost certainly not going to get anything substandard. If anything, ‘Hurricanes And Halos’, which features a bigger song-writing contribution from the handsome couple of Jidell and Smith, is another confident step up for this band.

When I reviewed ‘The Girl With The Raven Mask’, I remarked that it generally takes a lot for me to get excited about an album that has one foot firmly planted in the realm of doom. Well, that statement remains true but Avatarium prove once again that they one of the few bands that can manage this feat. There’s something about this band that speaks to me.

This becomes even more unfathomable in many ways when I add in to the equation that Avatarium are also heavily steeped in 1970s nostalgia as well as seemingly professing an admiration for blues, classic rock and an occasional dalliance with psychedelia. If I take a look at my personal music collection, I have a hard job finding very much that fits within any of these genres. And yet, I love Avatarium. And I love ‘Hurricanes And Halos’. Go figure.

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In trying to do just that and figure out why I have such a connection with this band, I have hit upon many possibilities.

Firstly, there is the raw honesty and genuine depth found within the compositions themselves. You get the distinct impression as you listen, that nothing has been left at the door with these guys – it is all or nothing. When Jennie-Anne sings, she sings with such passion and richness that you can’t help but listen, rapt as she delivers her gritty monologues with finesse and such resonance. This is most definitely Jennie-Anne Smith’s best performance so far and at times, she threatens to steal the show entirely, such as within the chorus of the opener, ‘Into The Fire – Into The Storm’ as one of many examples.

With lesser musicians behind her, that might have easily happened. But not in Avatarium. In Marcus Jidell for example, Avatarium are blessed with one of the very best guitarists that I know of. I must have said all this a hundred times over the years, so once more couldn’t hurt. His style is not to belt out lightning fast lead runs or to show off with fancy gimmicks. Instead, he has a grace and elegance that means that he can convey an emotion or a thought with one carefully crafted note or a series of well thought-out chords.

As demonstrated in the aforementioned heady opener, ‘Into The Fire – Into The Storm’, Marcus has not forgotten how to rock out either. The song begins with a strong 70s doomy riff that gets things off to a bold and striking start. The Hammond organ of the equally impressive Nielsson joins the party briefly before becoming an integral part of the grand chorus and later, offers an indulgent but entirely fitting lead solo.

‘The Starless Sleep’ is another superb track, one that underlines the doom credentials of Avatarium as well as underlining the strength of the oft-unsung rhythm section. Skold’s drumming is precise but has a loose, carefree feel to it, whilst bassist Mats Rydström delivers a really satisfying low-end rumble to inject gravitas to the music.

The stripped back and darkly textured ‘Road To Jerusalem’ is the perfect song to act as contrast to the higher-octane opening tracks. It also showcases the beautifully organic and honest production to ‘Hurricanes And Halos’. This is not an album to be smothered in clever, modern effects or polished to within an inch of its life. Instead, in keeping with the music itself, producer Marcus Jidell alongside David Castillo (mixing – Katatonia, Opeth) and Jens Bogren (mastering – Soilwork, Sepultura) have created a living, breathing, colourful beast that loses none of the music’s potency along the way.

The icing on the cake with ‘Hurricanes And Halos’ is the surprising amount of variety on offer. Already I’ve described the full-on power and the more subtle sides of Avatarium, but there’s more to uncover along the way.

‘Medusa Child’ is a thoroughly engrossing piece of music that begins in commanding and heavy fashion. The hooky chorus then comes out of nowhere, at an almost complete right-angle to the more aggressive and potent music that surrounds it. And then, at the half-way mark, it morphs again. An eerie child’s voice sings the chorus lyrics whilst underneath, the band veers into almost ambient, post-rock territory as a quiet, subtle melody begins to build into a rousing finale, almost threatening to implode as it does so.

‘Hurricanes and Halos’ is as far as I can tell, as much an exercise in creating interesting and multi-faceted soundscapes as it is about crafting intelligent doom-infused rock music. This point is proven eloquently via the brooding ‘When Breath Turns To Air’ with its exquisite and melodic fragility. But it is then hammered home by the closing title track which is quite different in construction and tone, but is equally poignant and captivating.

For me, it is the perfect way to end the record, a record that has impressed and moved me in equal measure right from the off. I can think of no other band in the modern era who does this kind of thing better than Avatarium. That in itself should speak volumes about just how good it is. I doubt I’ll hear a more compelling doom-infused rock album all year.

The Score Of Much Metal: 9.25

If you’ve enjoyed this review, you can check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

Ayreon – The Source
Until Rain – Inure
MindMaze – Resolve
God Dethroned – The World Ablaze
Bjorn Riis – Forever Comes To An End
Voyager – Ghost Mile
Big Big Train – Grimspound
Lonely Robot – The Big Dream
Firespawn – The Reprobate
Ancient Ascendant
Pyramaze – Contingent
Shores Of Null – Black Drapes For Tomorrow
Asira – Efference
Hologram Earth – Black Cell Program
Damnations Day – A World Awakens
Memoriam – For The Fallen
Pallbearer – Heartless
Sleepmakeswaves – Made of Breath Only
Ghost Ship Octavius – Ghost Ship Octavius
Vangough – Warpaint
Telepathy – Tempest
Obituary – Obituary
Fen – Winter
Havok – Conformicide
Wolfheart – Tyhjyys
Svart Crown – Abreaction
Nova Collective – The Further Side
Immolation – Atonement
The Mute Gods – Tardigrades Will Inherit The Earth
Ex Deo – The Immortal Wars
Pyogenesis – A Kingdom To Disappear
My Soliloquy – Engines of Gravity
Nailed To Obscurity – King Delusion
Helion Prime – Helion Prime
Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day

Anticipated music in 2017 – an update – 11 March 2017

It is becoming something of a trend now that  almost immediately after I post one of these updates, one of the mentioned bands will release something new, either a new song or more detailed information about their upcoming release. On the one hand, it is quite funny. But on the other, it means that I’m left tearing out what little hair I have left.

It also means that there is justification for writing another update, so that’s what I shall keep doing. Today’s update is briefer than normal but is also one of the most important to date in my opinion.

If you’ve missed any of my previous updates, they can be accessed via the links at the bottom of this post.

Voyager – Ghost Mile
Release date: 12 May 2017

Here is the biggest culprit this time around for releasing something just after I mention them in an update. But it’s Voyager, so I immediately forgive them and bring you the latest news that I have regarding the modern melodic progressive metal band with pop/synth leanings.

According to the band themselves, the release date for ‘Ghost Mile’ is 12th May 2017 and, having now reached their pledge target, they have released the first track off the new album. Here it is in all its glory and I’m sure you’ll agree that it’s a bit of a monster.

Anathema – TBC
Release date: TBC

This is arguably the biggest news that could come out in 2017 – a new album from Anathema. The Liverpudlian band are one of my all-time favourite artists and after many of the big hitters in my world released albums in 2016, Anathema are set to return this year with brand new material. I have this on very good authority, so trust me on this.

Anathema are one of those bands that seem to effortlessly create beautiful and poignant music. I have lost count of the amount of times I have shed tears whilst listening to this band and frankly, long may that continue.

I will admit to having a few nerves leading up to this new album because I have such high hopes for Anathema and I pray that the new album delivers in the same way that the last two or three certainly have. if you recall, the title track from ‘Distant Satellites’ was noteworthy because of the increased use of electronica – I’m wondering whether this might be an area of greater exploration this time around? Whilst I do love that track, I have to admit that I hope it isn’t a future trend, because I love Anathema most when the music is more organic, beautiful and lyrically intense.

As I said, I have it on very good authority that the album will see the light of day sooner rather than later, so hopefully we won’t have to wait much longer to find out.

Moonspell – 1755
Release date: November 2017

K1600_1755I’ve had a soft spot for Moonspell ever since I heard the awesome ‘Irreligious’ back when I was a teenager. However, as far as I was concerned, it took until 2015 and the release of ‘Extinct’ for the Portugese Gothic metallers to hit somewhere near to the heights reached some 20 years ago.

My love for the band has now been well and truly rejuvenated and so when I heard that a new album was due in the near future, I was excited. Having now read a little more about it, I remain excited but also highly intrigued.

Entitled ‘1755’ it will centre on the Great Lisbon Earthquake of that year and, as the press release states, “the band has developed a lyrical concept that looks into the death and rebirth of Lisbon and how the disaster changed Religion, Politics and Philosophy in the whole of Europe.”

What’s more, it will be heavier than ‘Extinct’ and will be sung entirely in Portuguese. The image attached may or may not be the cover artwork, but it gives us a bit more of an idea of what we might expect in November. My appetite has been whetted, how about yours?

Teramaze – TBC
Release date: TBC

I reviewed the most recent album from Australian melodic progressive metal band Teramaze on this very blog and I was rather taken by it I must admit.

As a result, I have been buoyed by news that new material is being worked on at the moment. I have no firm answers as to whether a new record would be released in 2017 but I will keep my fingers crossed. In the meantime, the band have released a snippet of the new music they are writing which I thought I’d share with you.

The noises coming early from the band’s camp suggest that they are really happy with the way the music is shaping up, which is always nice to hear. And, if this demo material is anything to go by, the satisfaction of the Teramaze guys is pretty understandable.

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Previous updates:

5th March 2017
26th February 2017
13th February 2017
3rd February 2017
30th January 2017
21st January 2017

Pyogenesis – A Kingdom To Disappear – Album Review

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Artist: Pyogenesis

Album Title: A Kingdom To Disappear

Label: AFM Records

Date Of Release: 24 February 2017

German metal band Pyogenesis have been around since the beginning of the 90s and, despite a prolonged hiatus between 2002 and 2015, have released seven albums in that time. The return of the Stuttgart-based quartet in 2015 with ‘A Century In The Curse Of Time’ was nectar to the ears of long-term fans and now, two years later, Flo V. Schwarz (guitars, vocals), Gizz Butt (guitars, backing vocals), Malte Brauer (bass, backing vocals) and Jan Räthje (drums) return to deliver album number eight, ‘A Kingdom To Disappear’.

And yet, despite this lengthy history, I had never checked out Pyogenesis prior to reviewing this record. Pyogenesis were a black hole in my knowledge and as far as I could remember, I’d not even listened to a single song. I had no idea what to expect and wasn’t even considering a review.

So what changed? I was scrolling through my social media timelines and I heard a few positive comments about this record. Most notably, a fellow blogger who I admire was very effusive with praise over this record and so I felt I had to investigate further. I tracked down a couple of songs on the ‘net and whilst it wasn’t instant love at first listen, there was something going on that intrigued me. To be honest, I think much of what attracted me was the epic and quirky nature of the videos that accompanied the music; it seemed to me that the band were 100% into the music and were living it. Videos can be deceptive, but on this occasion, I believed the vision that the band were creating and went along for the ride.

It has turned out to be a ride that I have really enjoyed too and it leaves me thoroughly entertained but also a little confounded as to why they never attracted my attention earlier. If ‘A Kingdom To Disappear’ is an accurate example of the music that Pyogenesis have been creating all these years, I can’t understand why they never previously hit my radar.

On paper, the blend of extreme metal, hard rock, Gothic overtones and huge, epic melodies sounds like it should be right up my street. And so it has proved because this is a cracking album, an increasingly addictive listen that is over insanely quickly. ‘A Kingdom To Disappear’ spans nine tracks and a total of around 46 minutes but such is the level of entertainment, it feels like it is much shorter than that. This is clearly a good thing.

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Setting the album up, is the short opener ‘Sleep Is Good’ which introduces a key ingredient to the Pyogenesis sound, namely multiple vocalists. Atop a rousing, stomping melody sits a multi-layered vocal hook that is instantly glorious.

Out of this brief opening salvo comes ‘Every Man For Himself And God Against All’ and it delivers an immediate aural kicking. It begins in all-out brutal death metal territory complete with deep, guttural vocals before opening up into one of the most glorious, anthemic and sing-along choruses on the record. It was quirky to begin with when I watched the video, but I have grown to love it. The rhythm section delivers a powerful platform , the guitars create swathes of huge sound and the clean vocals of Schwarz ooze passion and emotion.

‘I Have Seen My Soul’ by contrast begins with a keyboard and atmosphere-drenched slow pounding riff that’s pure modern Evergrey territory, an element that remains throughout the song despite the more hard rock-inspired chorus that cuts through the cloying misery that permeates this huge song brilliantly. And in spite of the subject matter, you’ll be singing this track for weeks, guaranteed. It’s an obscure reference point, but if you’ve ever heard the likes of Mechanical Poet, you’ll recognise the chosen guitar tones from Pyogenesis, something that takes a little getting used to but works very nicely to compliment the band’s full-on approach.

Frankly though, the killer hooks and melodies are all over this album like a rash. ‘It’s Too Late (A Kingdom To Disappear)’ features more layered vocals from almost every corner of the band to create something very memorable,

‘New Helvetia’ gives listeners something a little different in that it is an acoustic guitar-led ballad of sorts. It is the perfect vehicle to demonstrate the band’s more delicate side as well as the not-inconsiderable talents of guitarists Schwarz and Gizz Butt. And speaking of different, there’s also ‘That’s When Everyone Gets Hurt’, which is a much more atmospheric number that brings those more Gothic elements to the fore whilst blending them with a hint of the 80s, electronic darkwave and even a smattering of post-metal. And yet, such is the strength of the melodies, I really enjoy listening to it.

And then, before you can seemingly blink, we’re treated to the most epic of all the songs on this great record, ‘Everlasting Pain’. And what a finale this is. It lasts for over thirteen minutes but it deserves this length. At its core, this is quite a straightforward composition, dominated by yet another monster of a melody that gets right under my skin. And yet despite this, it rather contradictorily contains plenty of light and shade and has a very slightly progressive feel to it, as it twists and turns through peaks and troughs of emotion. You can feel this vein of emotion all through the song, whether it is within the heavier sections and faux gruff vocals or via the quieter acoustic guitars and soft, fragile voice of Schwarz. And the closing three or so minutes are utterly brilliant, as the intensity builds to finally overflow in a flamboyant release, led by wailing guitars, pleading vocals and one last reprise of the central melody and chorus.

A mere 26 years after forming, I have finally checked Pyogenesis out and I am one very impressed reviewer. I can’t say for sure whether long-term fans will like it because I simply have no frame of reference. Personally-speaking, I have fallen for the charms of the German outfit and I can guarantee that on the strength of ‘A Kingdom To Disappear’, my next review of Pyogenesis will come with a more extensive knowledge of their entire back catalogue.

The Score Of Much Metal: 8.75

If you’ve enjoyed this review, check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

My Soliloquy – Engines of Gravity
Nailed To Obscurity – King Delusion
Helion Prime – Helion Prime
Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day

My Soliloquy – Engines of Gravity – Album Review

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Artist: My Soliloquy

Album Title: Engines Of Gravity

Label: Artic Records

Release date: Spring 2017

In 2012, Pete Morten, guitarist with one of my favourite progressive metal bands of all time, released a debut album under his own steam. The Threshold man called his band My Soliloquy and ‘The Interpreter’ was the title of that full-length debut. And I was very impressed. But, when I say ‘band’ that might be a little misleading. You see, Pete is a hideously talented chap and so he handled all instruments on ‘The Interpreter’ himself, except for the drums for which he drafted in Damon Roots.

Fast forward nearly five years and we’re on the cusp of the release of the sophomore album from My Soliloquy, ‘Engines Of Gravity’. I’m delighted because quite often, these side projects have a habit of being one-off endeavours. Not here though, as Pete Morten is clearly enthused and motivated enough to release a new album, despite the effort that it must take to create such a thing almost single-handedly.

Again, as with the debut, it is the same modus operandi on ‘Engines Of Gravity’ in that, drums aside, Pete has handled everything himself, from the song writing to the production, even the artwork which is hugely impressive. Again, Damon Roots is his chosen sidekick in the rhythm department, meaning that there is a nice consistency at play here.

Naturally, ever since I knew that a new album was in the offing, I have been looking forward to hearing it. However, I was also worried because I fervently hoped that the material would live up to my self-created hype. And, with Pete being such a genuinely lovely guy, I desperately wanted to like this record even more. I can’t be dishonest but I hate hurting artists feelings too – that’s not what the Blog of Much Metal is all about.

But you know what? Having lived with ‘Engines of Gravity’ for a week or two, I needn’t have been so nervous. ‘Engines Of Gravity’ is, if anything, a step up for Pete, both in terms of song writing and his performances. The melodic, atmospheric and rather epic-sounding brand of progressive metal with a gritty, almost sci-fi edge on offer here demonstrates an increasing maturity and underlines what a talented chap Pete is, not to mention that he is a safe pair of hands. Don’t you just hate people like this?

If I have anything approaching a small quibble with ‘Engines Of Gravity’, it is where the production is concerned. I fully appreciate the budgetary constraints under which Pete Morten will have found himself here and generally, he has done a very good job. All of the instruments come through in the mix and there is plenty of clarity. However, I can’t help but quietly wish that the rhythm guitar tones were even more powerful, particularly given the fact that this is Pete’s primary instrument. Just occasionally, they deserve a little more oomph. But to contextualise this, it is a very minor issue with an otherwise superb release.

Having got that out of the way, let’s focus on the strengths of ‘Engines of Gravity’ because there are several. Firstly there’s the tone and the feel of the album which I believe needs to be addressed separately. This is a multi-layered and multi-faceted album that explores many different tones and textures throughout its length. The nine compositions each have their own identity but cleverly, fit into the overall aural tapestry, one that is filled with richness and not a little amount of thought-provoking material both musically and lyrically.

‘Engines of Gravity’ begins in immensely strong fashion with ‘In Bed With The Enemy’, a dramatic track that begins with strange electronic sounds that build in intensity and give way to bold bass work and a sharp riff overlaid with lashings of synths and more virtuosic lead guitar embellishments. The chorus is a soaring, melodic affair and there’s a deeply sombre spoken word section sampled above a more minimalist soundscape which tackles to some extent the issue of global capitalism with sobering results. Right at the outset then, you’re left in no doubt that Pete Morten is not shy of confronting big issues with his music, a trend that continues throughout the record.

To underline this, ‘Fire In The Blood’ takes over and is a much shorter, punchier affair that fundamentally deals with human sexuality and the way that sex is often misused. The music itself calls to mind Pete’s work with Threshold, thanks to the overall song structure and wonderfully chunky riffing.

In classic prog style, the next two songs, ‘A Modern Lexicon’ and ‘Lamentation’ form a suite that extends beyond the ten-minute mark but does so with style and panache. I adore the repetitive single-note guitar and synth combo that slowly gives way to more flamboyant led guitar work but which is a recurring theme within ‘…Lexicon’. The use of light and shade as well as differing tempos is nicely done, injecting more drama to the music. And during the quieter passages, the bass is allowed to take the limelight, accented by solid drumming from Roots. The keys are an ever present too, creating plenty of atmosphere in the process. ‘Lamentation’ is a much shorter, more straightforward piece that, to my mind, summons the spirit of Pink Floyd.

‘The Progenitor’ has a much darker, foreboding, almost sinister edge to it. Pete’s keys suggest something more suspenseful and filmic over which he song journeys with purpose and purposeful intent.

Possibly my favourite track on ‘Engines Of Gravity’ hits in the form of ‘A Kind Of Fury’. As the title suggests, it begins in heavy, urgent fashion before opening up slightly to increase the impact of the synths within a beautiful chorus melody. Here, I’m firmly of the opinion that Pete offers some of his best vocals on the entire record. Deeply resonant one moment and then soaring towards the high notes the next, Morten shows his impressive range and proves that his voice has further improved since the debut.

A very intriguing and almost creepy spoken-word sample ushers in ‘Darkness Is Gathering’. It is of an older female American reciting what must be religious text but in the context of this song with its subtle intensity and unsettling sounds, it has a more profound impact than it otherwise might have. The layered melodic vocals are stunning within a composition that threatens to explode but instead smoulders until it climaxes in strong but well-controlled fashion. It is more powerful because of this and the whole thing burrows insidiously into my skin.

Talking of profound impacts, it leads me perfectly into the utterly exquisite ‘Confluence’. A piano and vocal led ballad of sorts, the melodies make it feel sad but the lyrics betray something a little more positive with close listening. The vocal melodies are sublime and the lyrics of ‘Keep your heart clear, keep your conscience near…keep your head when all appears lost, it’s not hopeless…’ really strike a chord with me. I don’t mind admitting that my eyes have moistened on occasion as I’ve listened to this song.

‘Engines Of Gravity’ bids farewell via ‘The Emptying of Meaning’ one of three songs to break the eight-minute barrier. The pounding drums make quite an opening statement before the ante is upped through more strong, simple riffs and wailing lead guitars. My Soliloquy are not going to shrink quietly into the night as this is one of the most dramatic and commanding tracks on offer, full of heaviness via double-pedal drumming, slick riffs, yet more layers of lush synths and a genuinely progressive sheen to boot, accentuated by a complete change of pace around the midway point which I really like.

I hadn’t intended on writing a blow-by-blow account of ‘Engines Of Gravity’ but if it is good enough and deserves it, why not? I wasn’t blown away on a first listen; more accurately, my love of this album has grown gently over time. As a result, I feel that it has made more of a lasting impression on me and I find myself humming certain melodies or phrases when I least expect it. Cutting to the chase, I heartily recommend My Soliloquy and ‘Engines of Gravity’ to anyone who appreciates well-crafted and intelligent progressive metal. It’s that simple.

The Score Of Much Metal: 9.25

If you’ve enjoyed this review, check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day

Nailed To Obscurity – King Delusion – Album Review

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Artist: Nailed To Obscurity

Album Title: King Delusion

Label: Apostasy Records

Date Of Release: 3 February 2017

Melodic death/doom metal is a niche genre that has always found favour with me. I love the blend of extremity combined with dark, bleak atmospheres and melancholic beauty; it is the perfect blend for people like me. So I had to review the new album, ‘King Delusion’ from German quintet Nailed To Obscurity, their third in a career that has now spanned over a decade.

Despite my general love of this genre, I am the first to admit that the scene has become saturated by a sea of bands that have sought to hang onto the coat tails of those that spawned this style in the first place. It therefore becomes ever harder to effectively sort the wheat from the chaff and occasionally, I will make a faux pas. Most evident on the strength of ‘King Delusion’, is not having given Nailed To Obscurity a fair crack of the whip over the years. I really enjoyed ‘Opaque’ when it was released four years ago but never explored much further.

The German quintet, comprised of vocalist Raimund Ennenga, guitarists Jan Ole Lamberti and Volker Dieken, bassist Carsten Schorn and drummer Jann Hillrichs do not reinvent the melodic death/doom wheel. Nevertheless, ‘King Delusion’ is a thoroughly engaging eight-track record that takes its cue from very early Katatonia, Daylight Dies and even a soupcon of Insomnium. Loving all of these bands as I do, it is hardly surprising that I like the resultant output of Nailed To Obscurity. Loosely following the blueprint of a forerunner though is not a guaranteed route to success. I have lost count of the number of bands I have heard that have failed dreadfully at doing just this. Nailed To Obscurity however, are not one of these. Their influences are clear to hear but what they do, they do very well. They inject their music with plenty of quality and a smattering of originality to make their offering well worth listening to.

That originality comes through via an injection of post-metal to keep things more current and interesting. This element is most obvious within ‘Apnoea’, a two-minute instrumental interlude of sorts. It is dark, depraved and foreboding, but also hauntingly melancholy and ever so slightly beautiful. It might even be my favourite two minutes on the record, as those guitars create a wonderfully potent noise.

Nailed to Obscurity

Photo credit: Kerstin Bruemmer

There’s even a brief detour into more instantly accessible Gothic territory courtesy of the gorgeously rich and inviting ‘Deadening’.

But that said, the bulk of ‘King Delusion’ has its roots firmly planted in the melodic death/doom scene and it is where this band truly belongs. The opening notes are borderline discordant and jangling, before the meatiness of the death riffs join the fray, bulldozing all in its meandering path. As the track gets into full swing, those melodic lead guitar lines are unleashed that more than hint at early Katatonia, but rather than baulk at them, I embrace them because they are so well placed and well executed.

Having listened to this record a fair few times now, I find it hard to identify a weak track anywhere. Each of the compositions offers something to tempt me into a repeated listen, be it a grim atmosphere, a seductive lead guitar line or Ennenga’s deep and guttural voice that counterpoints the brittle melodies and which only occasionally breaks into clean territory.

I have to conclude however, that the second half is the stronger in my opinion, dominated as it is by the undeniable centrepiece, the 12-minute epic ‘Uncage My Sanity’. To use that overused cliché, it takes the listener on a journey that twists and turns (or more accurately slithers) through aural highs and lows and juxtaposing ideas that come together surprisingly cohesively. The standout section for me is around the half-way mark where the heaviness completely drops away in favour of a deeply atmospheric, minimalist soundscape that builds to dramatic effect whilst keeping the melodiousness intact.

Either side of this is ‘Memento’ and ‘Devoid’, both of which are killer tracks which share a similar, slightly more upbeat structure. Dare I say it, they are both undeniably catchy, pulling me in from the first listen. They both just get better with repeated listens too.

‘Memento’ is ushered in by minimalist post-rock sounds before a delightful lead guitar line takes precedence and around which, the track is built. It is full-on goosebump territory as the full power of the entire band kicks in to devastating effect. The tone of the track shifts as it develops, including a segment that is reminiscent of mid-era Dark Tranquillity via the sampled sounds. But central to the piece is the vibrant bass of xx and the way in which the majority of the song skips along at an infectious pace.

‘Devoid’ on the other hand is heavy but has the air of a much softer song somehow. The melodies are bittersweet and in addition to the rumbling riff and striking lead guitar dual combo that typifies Nailed To Obscurity, there’s a brief foray into something much quieter and soulful buried in the centre of the song. And that’s all without mentioning the anthemic closing passage which is just a miserable joy.

Thanks to ‘King Delusion’, Nailed To Obscurity should no longer resemble their moniker and remain obscure and on the fringes. It might not be the most unique-sounding album but when it is delivered in such an assured and professional way, who cares? I thoroughly enjoy listening to ‘King Delusion’ and have no hesitation in saying that Nailed To Obscurity have put down an early marker in 2017 for all other bands of a melodic death/doom persuasion.

The Score Of Much Metal: 8.5

If you’ve enjoyed this review, check out my others from previous years and for 2017 right here:

2015 reviews
2016 reviews

Helion Prime – Helion Prime
Battle Beast – Bringer Of Pain
Persefone – Aathma
Soen – Lykaia
Exquirla – Para Quienes Aun Viven
Odd Logic – Effigy
Mors Principium Est – Embers Of A Dying World
Firewind – Immortals
Slyde – Back Again EP
Sepultura – Machine Messiah
Deserted Fear – Dead Shores Rising
Kreator – Gods Of Violence
Borealis – World of Silence MMXVII
Pain of Salvation – In The Passing Light of Day