Pure Reason Revolution – Above Cirrus – Album Review

Artist: Pure Reason Revolution

Album Title: Above Cirrus

Label: InsideOut Music

Date of Release: 6 May 2022

The last album by Pure Reason Revolution was the first that I encountered, having missed out on their early career. And, despite not necessarily being the archetypal kind of music that I’d normally gravitate towards, it is fair to say that ‘Eupnea’ made a positive impression upon me. Of it, I wrote:

“And there you have it. Consider me a convert to the Pure Reason Revolution cause. ‘Eupnea’ is an intelligent blend of electronica, progressive rock that is made all the stronger due to some beguiling melodic sensitivity. I like the music more with every listen and I’m now very excited to delve into the band’s past at the earliest opportunity.”

Almost exactly two years later, Pure Reason Revolution have returned with ‘Above Cirrus’ and this time, the core duo of Jon Courtney (guitar, vocals, keys) and Chloe Alper (bass, vocals, keys) have brought with them a new full-time member to extend the band to a trio. I say ‘new’, but the new addition will be a familiar name to long-term fans, as it’s guitarist/vocalist Greg Jong who features as a full member for the first time since the 2005 EP, ‘Cautionary Tales For The Brave’.

Having spent some considerably time digesting ‘Above Cirrus’, it’s almost a cut and paste job from the quote above in many ways. Once again, Pure Reason Revolution have created a record that, on paper, I shouldn’t really take to, too heavily, but they have won me over. And the success of this new album is the combination of fascinating, deep lyrical content, emotion, the variation of styles, powerful melodies, and strong songwriting that means it all comes together in a really enjoyable package. It’s a bit of a grower too, with several songs suddenly, out of nowhere, finding their way into my brain to be hummed or sung when least expected.

Returning to the lyrics for a moment, and once again, the words are inspired by Courtney’s personal thoughts and journeys, with an overall message routed in optimism. ‘Above Cirrus’ isn’t a concept album though, as each song stands on its own, but with a central idea that ‘through the turbulence, we’ll help each other through the darkness.’ I find this to be an appealing central thread, which only serves to add greater strength and poignancy to the music. Even the cover art, which might seem sad on face value, is an extension of the lyrical content, in that the polar bear is suffering, but is adapting, surviving, and in so doing, offers hope.

Moving on to the music itself, and the electronic nature of the Pure Reason Revolution sound is exposed from the very beginning, with a gentle beat sitting beneath a spoken-word sample. From there, a powerful, almost tribal drumbeat kicks in to move the song forward forcefully, before an equally abrasive riff emerges. There’s a strong energy to the song that’s infectious, and even though I’m not totally sold on the heavily effect-laden vocals at points, the mix of layered male and female vocals really shines. It’s a short, sharp track to open the album, but it contains a melodic intent to ensure it’s as memorable as it is striking.

The contrast between the opener and ‘New Kind Of Evil’ is pronounced, as this song begins much more delicately and sedately, with a much greater emphasis on melody from the outset. That said, you can feel the increase in intensity that’s lurking just below the surface, wanting to break loose. The sense of drama that this creates is excellent, as is the central chorus melody which is one of those big earworm affairs. I also love the precise, yet smooth ebb and flow which leads to a bold release just shy of the half-way mark yet recedes just as quickly into calmer waters. The addition of tinkling piano notes is a very welcome addition, nicely juxtaposing the more overt electronic sounds that appear later in the track, as it ends on an authoritative note.

‘Phantoms’, another shorter composition, is arguably my least favourite on the album, but I do like the more pronounced electronics that feature alongside more male/female duetted vocals. It’s then superseded by one of the very best songs on ‘Above Cirrus’, that of ‘Cruel Deliverance’. It’s a slower, more introspective piece, but it contains the most gorgeous of melodies, the one more than any other that I find myself singing in my head at three in the morning, or whilst out with the dog on the park. Ironically, for one with the moniker of ‘The Man Of Much Metal’, this is also the most mainstream sounding, and least ‘heavy’ of all of the seven compositions on the record. But a great melody is a great melody, and it’s this that speaks to me above everything else. Mind you, the mid-song minimalist, cinematic section is inspired too.

At a touch over ten minutes, ‘Scream Sideways’ is the longest single composition, but it uses the time wisely, exploring a myriad of textures and soundscapes, from gentle, ethereal minimalism to driving prog rock, and from bold, experimental electronic vistas to spiky, aggressive post rock walls of sound. Once again though, despite the variations on offer, the song writing is such that the whole thing feels homogenous, tied together by some subtle melodies along the way.

And to close, we have ‘Lucid’ that is a beguiling track, full of great musicianship, from all members of the band, not to mention further memorable melodic intent. Even the brief inclusion of a saxophone barely dulls my enjoyment of the song, a song that once again shows the expertise in building drama and tension through passages of light and shade, of quiet contemplation, and all-out explosions of near-metallic strength.

On balance, as much as I enjoyed ‘Eupnea’, I can only conclude that I find myself enjoying ‘Above Cirrus’ even more. I’m not sure I can put my finger on quite why, but once the dust has settled and I am able to observe things from a distance, I get the feeling that it will ultimately come down to the strength and potency of the melodies. ‘Above Cirrus’ continues where ‘Eupnea’ left off, but also ups the ante and, in so doing, provides forty-five minutes of genuine musical pleasure. I heartily recommend ‘Above Cirrus’ to anyone with a liking for intelligent, melodic, electronic-infused progressive rock.

The Score of Much Metal: 89%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Demonical – Mass Destroyer

I Am The Night – While The Gods Are Sleeping

Haunted By Silhouettes – No Man Isle

Delvoid – Swarmlife

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Delvoid – Swarmlife – Album Review

Artist: Delvoid

Album Title: Swarmlife

Label: Banditt Media

Date of Release: 29 April 2022

Another new name to me, Delvoid are an interesting discovery, and one well worth bringing to your attention with a manofmuchmetal.com review. From the Norwegian capital, Oslo, or just outside, Delvoid have been in existence since 2008, and the quartet define themselves as alternative rock that “consists of noisy sound walls, vulnerable melodies, and mammoth-sized riffs.” They go on to say that they “…chase the same white whale as Tool and Sigur Ros, but add their own flavour of psychedelia and minimalism to the hunt.”

What is unusual is that I can definitely hear the references they make, but more so with Tool than Sigur Ros if I’m honest. The music does have plenty of quiet, subtle moments, but Sigur Ros are not the first name I think of when I’m listening to this record. Apparently, this third album is slightly different from previous efforts in that it dials up the psychedelia and the prog elements in favour of the more orchestral approach used previously and specifically with their last release, 2015’s ‘Serene’.

If I could use one word to describe ‘Swarmlife’ overall, it would have to be ‘frustrating’. Some of this record is sublime, whilst other parts don’t quite hit my sweet spot as forcefully. At nearly an hour in length, but comprised of just six tracks, this is an album where the band take their time to build up tension, allow the music to ebb and flow, and explore different sounds and textures along the way. But, it has to be said that some of the compositions are better than others for my tastes, leading to vast expanses of music that I wouldn’t necessarily skip, but which can have a tendency to drag a little as I await the parts of the record that I really like.

My slight disappointment is felt all the more keenly because ‘Swarmlife’ starts off so well. ‘Techtree’ is a ten-minute opening force of nature that shows what Delvoid are capable of when at their very best. Beginning slowly and tentatively, it takes a while for the song to build, but the tension is palpable, as you know something is awaiting just around the corner – or at least you hope it is. There’s a repetitive nature to the music as it gently increases the intensity, exploding after well after two minutes to reveal a lovely melodic guitar riff courtesy of Erik J. Halbakken and Alex M. Delver. In the blink of an eye, it is gone, replaced by vocals, bass, and drums, but when it returns after a period of excellently created introspection, it makes one hell of an impact; the melody is superb, the emotion equally so, as it tears at the heartstrings and sends shivers down my spine. Progressive this track certainly is, but there are big post-rock influences in the latter stages, where walls of guitar driven sound create a hugely impressive force against which it is hard not to succumb.

I’m less enamoured with the follow-up ‘Urras’, which is altogether less melodic, but much angrier, spikier, and caustic, led by the anguished screams and shouts of vocalist Alex M. Delver. Admittedly, after several spins, the understated catchiness of the music does start to make inroads, whilst the impressive musicianship becomes ever more evident, especially the drumming of Espen Th. Granseth, and the dancing bass of Magnus Andersen. And when Delver delivers his clean, melodious tones, he has an undeniably good voice.

I could cut and paste much of the previous paragraph for ‘Out Of Labour’. At over ten minutes, it covers a lot of ground musically, with much to admire, not least the conviction with which the lyrics are delivered and the top-drawer musicianship. But crucially, I don’t love it because, for me, there is a lack of killer melody within the composition, leading it to be the least effective track on the record as far as I am concerned.

Where Delvoid really shine for me, is when they explore their melodic sensibilities more keenly. ‘Collapsist’ is another lengthy track that ebbs and flows fluently, from heavy, clashing outbursts, to incredibly deft and gentle minimalism. Throughout the song though, the melodies are stronger, better defined, and therefore make a much bigger impression on me. That said, the real magic doesn’t appear until beyond the six-minute mark, when all pretence at heaviness is cast aside and the final three or four minutes are a poignant and stunning exercise in ambience and emotion. Remember those Sigur Ros references? Well, this is where they are heard and felt most strongly, complete with echoed, ethereal vocals that only add to the overall impact.

One of only two tracks under double figures, ‘Third Body’ provides flashes of brilliance within it. The melodies are a slow-burn affair, but in order to take the contrasts between light and shade that little step further than before, the band introduce some judiciously placed growls. It’s something I’d actually like to hear more of from Delvoid in future I must admit, as the growls are properly deep and menacing.

As it turns out, ‘Swarmlife’ is bookended by the best two tracks, with the magnificent ‘The Master’s House’ closing things out. At over thirteen minutes in length, it’s the longest of the six songs, but the delicate opening is gorgeous, and is allowed to take its time to slowly, carefully build, recede, and then unfurl through a wonderfully groovy riff. Not so much an explosion, as a robust increase in power and sonic authority. As is the Delvoid way, the ebb and flow to the song is great, creating some captivating textures along the way. In the second half of the song, some of the most stunning melodies emerge, to end the record on a genuinely warm, entertaining, and serene note, albeit a rather bittersweet one as the track unwinds into ambient territory, and slowly recedes to nothing.  

I feel, in retrospect that maybe the word ‘frustrating’ may have been a touch harsh on Delvoid and ‘Swarmlife’. When you stop and analyse it, there are so many positive attributes to this record, that to deride it based on one and a half songs that don’t hit the mark as strongly as the rest, seems unfair. So instead, what I will say is that ‘Swarmlife’ is a very commendable progressive, alternative rock/metal album that suggests to me that they have a big future ahead of them. More melody, more growls, but more of the same in terms of technicality, contrasts, and emotion next time please gentlemen. Grant me these wishes, and we may be on to a bona-fide album of the year contender.

The Score of Much Metal: 80%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

LionSoul – A Pledge To Darkness

Watain – The Agony And Ecstasy Of Watain

Dischordia – Triptych

Dragonbreed – Necrohedron

Audrey Horne – Devil’s Bell

Vanum – Legend

Stone Broken – Revelation

Radiant – Written By Life

Skull Fist – Paid In Full

Hurakan – Via Aeturna

Incandescence – Le Coeur De L’Homme

Imminent Sonic Destruction – The Sun Will Always Set

Monuments – In Stasis

Soledad – XIII

Viande – L’abime dévore les âmes

Credic – Vermillion Oceans

Postcards From New Zealand – Burn, Witch, Burn

Darkher – The Buried Storm

Treat – The Endgame

Bjørn Riis – Everything To Everyone

Destruction – Diabolical

Et Moriemur – Tamashii No Yama

Angel Nation – Antares

Wolf – Shadowland

Denali – Denali EP

Centinex – The Pestilence EP

Meshuggah – Immutable

Chapter Of Hate – Bloodsoaked Decadence EP

Ancient Settlers – Our Last Eclipse

Tranzat – Ouh La La

Playgrounded – The Death Of Death

Father Befouled – Crowned In Veneficum

Abbath – Dread Reaver

PreHistoric Animals – The Magical Mystery Machine (Chapter 2)

Kvaen – The Great Below

Michael Romeo – War Of The Worlds, Part 2

Dark Funeral – We Are The Apocalypse

Carmeria – Advenae

Agathodaimon – The Seven

Moonlight Haze – Animus

Hellbore – Panopticon

Konvent – Call Down The Sun

Idol Of Fear – Trespasser

The Midgard Project – The Great Divide

Threads Of Fate – The Cold Embrace Of The Light

Arkaik – Labyrinth Of Hungry Ghosts

New Horizon – Gate Of The Gods

Cailleach Calling – Dreams Of Fragmentation

Tundra – A Darkening Sky

Sylvaine – Nova

Hath – All That Was Promised

Sabaton – The War To End All Wars

Kuolemanlaakso – Kuusumu

Oh Hiroshima – Myriad

Godless Truth – Godless Truth

Shape Of Despair – Return To The Void

Eight Bells – Legacy Of Ruin

Embryonic Devourment – Heresy Of The Highest Order

Serious Black – Vengeance Is Mine

Allegaeon – Damnum

HammerFall – Hammer Of Dawn

Immolation – Acts Of God

Veonity – Elements Of Power

Nightrage – Abyss Rising

Arjen Anthony Lucassen’s Star One – Revel In Time

Pure Wrath – Hymn To The Woeful Hearts

Dagoba – By Night

The Last Of Lucy – Moksha

Arð – Take Up My Bones

Embryonic Autopsy – Prophecies Of The Conjoined

The Devils Of Loudun – Escaping Eternity

Cult Of Luna – The Long Road North

WAIT – The End Of Noise

Abysmal Dawn – Nightmare Frontier

Amorphis – Halo

Nordic Giants – Sybiosis

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

Nordic Giants – Symbiosis – Album Review

Artist: Nordic Giants

Album Title: Symbiosis

Label: Independent Release

Date of Release:  4 February 2022

You’ve got to love a musical entity that’s shrouded in mystery, haven’t you? I mean, it adds to the aura that surrounds the music, and to an extent, stops the focus being on the people. You can therefore concentrate on the audible output 100%. Well, that’s the theory anyway. It doesn’t always work, as the constant speculation around who is or isn’t involved can sometimes get in the way of more important things. Nevertheless, whatever the pros and cons, it is a path that Nordic Giants have taken. Formed well over a decade ago, we still only know that Nordic Giants is a duo, who go by the names of Rôka and Löki. All else is just unconfirmed conjecture.

What isn’t unconfirmed conjecture, and what’s beyond doubt is that musically, Nordic Giants have crafted something rather special here. ‘Symbiosis’ is their sophomore studio long-player, following their debut ‘A Sèance of Dark Delusions’ and their subsequent documentary/soundtrack project entitled ‘Amplify Human Vibration’. Neither of these I am familiar with, but having now immersed myself in the work of Nordic Giants for the past week or two, I plan to change that very soon indeed.

I find it difficult to describe accurately the musical output on ‘Symbiosis’ because it encompasses many different ideas and genres. At the most basic, the music could be referred to as ambient post-rock I suppose, but when you then listen to the compositions on this album, you quickly realise that such a description feels too bland and one-dimensional. There are elements of classical music, cinematic film scores, pop, electronic, and a whole lot more besides. And all these elements collide in a glorious fusion that ultimately leads to a record that delights, comforts, entertains, and most importantly, has the power to make you feel. I cannot deny that I haven’t always found the music as easy to listen to as I would like, because some of its tenderness, and fragility has hit me hard, bringing me to tears along the way. But I’d prefer that than listen to something that leaves me unmoved and cold.

Interestingly, the record does not get off to the most auspicious start thanks to the discordant sound of wailing brass for a few seconds within the slow, dark opening of ‘Philosophy Of Mind’. Spoken word samples talking about what we do or do not know about the universe, as well as the power of the human mind quickly catch my attention, however. And the way that the composition builds is rather impressive, unfolding into an arresting piece of music that has rich piano notes and melodies at its heart. The drumming is both laid back and bold as the track ebbs and flows expertly, building up the tension as it goes. Initially not overly enamoured with the chosen central melodies, I have grown to love them; how could I not, as they swirl and eddy as the energy increases, and with it, the closest you get to a wall of sound from this duo. Instead, the urgency dies away yet again, toying cleverly with the listener. Strange electronic sounds emerge late on, giving the song an entirely new texture, as the spoken word samples return before a gloriously uplifting, almost euphoric section closes the track on a positive note.

‘Anamorphia’ follows and it’s a fairly different beast, although it maintains many of the elements of the opener, especially at the outset. The piano, once again, plays a central role, moving into jazz territory at the midway point. Delicate synths lace the piece with depth and richness of sound, whilst the ensuing build-up of power and potency is an utter delight, the melodies instantly gratifying and deeply emotional as it turns out.

If I thought that the first two tracks were good, ‘Hjem’ is even better. Translated simply as ‘Home’, it is one of the most stunningly beautiful and emotional songs I have heard for quite a while. In places it is not dissimilar to the works of Sigur Ros and their ilk, but the aching beauty in the melodies coupled with the minimalist, ambient soundscapes mean that I don’t think straight; the gorgeous piano notes, subtle guitar picking, and layers of serene synths captivate and suddenly my vision is blurred. Before I know it, tears are flowing freely as I sit in the dark, deep in thought, thought that’s both joyous and melancholy.

‘Faceless’ features the vocal talents of Alex Hedley, an English indie-folk musician predominantly. I’ll admit I wasn’t sold on his gravelly voice initially as it sounded like it could break at any moment. However, I was wrong. The explosive chorus that almost erupts out of extended introspective verses are magnificent, dripping with naked emotion, guitars wailing to the heavens in unison with Hedley’s powerful, pleading voice.

A second guest vocalist makes an appearance later in the album, namely Freyja, who adds her delicate ethereal vocals to ‘Spheres’. Again, like elsewhere, the minimalist approach carries a majestic and deeply powerful air, the melodies tugging at the heartstrings with ease. The drumming is slightly more pronounced, creating a bold backbone, but the swathes of synths and tinkling piano notes are the focal point for me, complimenting Freyja’s dreamy vocals perfectly.

‘Spires Of Ascendency’ is almost the twin to ‘Hjem’, a composition that is incredibly poignant and moving despite its apparent, overall simplicity. And the album comes to a close via the longer ‘Infinity’ which, just like its immediate predecessor insists on reintroducing an element of brass to its soundscape. However, also in keeping with ‘Spires Of Ascendency’ before it, the composition does not overly suffer from the inclusion of brass. Yes, I’d have preferred it not to appear, but you cannot question the quality of the track. I adore the opening sequence with its use of interesting sci-fi-like electronics, the way it compliments and enhances the more organic sounds that gradually appear as it develops. I feel like a broken record, but again, the melodies are strong and particularly bittersweet, building to an arresting and entirely fitting crescendo to see out ‘Symbiosis’, both cinematic and dramatic in equal measure, almost a final explosive outpouring of emotion upon which to end.

‘Symbiosis’ has definitely surprised me but in a very positive way indeed. When you’re suffering a deep personal melancholy, it might not be the very best idea to listen to music as emotional as this is. However, after a first impactful listen, I found myself magnetically drawn to the music, almost seeking it out so that I could deliberately let it move me. On that level, ‘Symbiosis’ has proven to be a rather cathartic listen as well as quite a profound one. I have since found out that Nordic Giants are playing a show relatively locally, so it would appear that I will be making a trip to see them. I suspect that live, this music will take on a whole new meaning and be even more moving. I’m braced and ready because I have to experience this beautiful music up close and personal.

The Score of Much Metal: 90%

Check out my other 2022 reviews here:

Persefone – Metanoia

Vorga – Striving Toward Oblivion

Mystic Circle – Mystic Circle

Nasson – Scars

Burned In Effigy – Rex Mortem

Silent Skies – Nectar

Celeste – Assassine(s)

Abyssus – Death Revival

SOM – The Shape Of Everything

Ashes Of Ares – Emperors And Fools

Beriedir – AQVA

Lalu – Paint The Sky

Nocturna – Daughters Of The Night

Battle Beast – Circus Of Doom

Lee McKinney – In The Light Of Knowledge

Descent – Order Of Chaos

Aethereus – Leiden

Toundra – Hex

Ilium – Quantum Evolution Event EP

Power Paladin – With The Magic Of Windfyre Steel

Necrophagous – In Chaos Ascend

Infected Rain – Ecdysis

Wilderun – Epigone

You can also check out my other reviews from previous years right here:

2021 reviews

2020 reviews

2019 reviews
2018 reviews
2017 reviews
2016 reviews
2015 reviews

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